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Old 11th May 2008
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i wound highly recommend this book for anyone wanting to learn assembly:

'Assembly-Language-Step-step-Programming' by Jeff Duntemann
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Old 11th May 2008
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Assembly is one thing I've never had time to learn much of, sounds like an interesting book though.
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Old 11th May 2008
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I would rather recommend this one:
Professional Assembly Language by Richard Blum
http://www.amazon.com/Professional-A...pd_sim_b_img_2

It is based on Linux, so almost everything is usable under FreeBSD after little modifications. Most important, it uses Unix standard tools like ld, gcc, gdb.
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Old 26th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hydra View Post
I would rather recommend this one:
Professional Assembly Language by Richard Blum
http://www.amazon.com/Professional-A...pd_sim_b_img_2

It is based on Linux, so almost everything is usable under FreeBSD after little modifications. Most important, it uses Unix standard tools like ld, gcc, gdb.
I like the Blum book for a couple of reasons. Like you said, it uses native gnu tools that are found on most Linux and BSD OS. Unfortunately it doesn't explain the difference in syscalls between Linux and the rest of the world or even mention they exist, so if you are trying to learn x86 from scratch and running FreeBSD (or some other non-Linux OS) you will not get very far. segfault. If you're already an advanced C programmer who wants to pick up assembly, this could be the book. If you want to learn Intel assembly as your first language, stick to 32 bit Linux or things will go bang like with Duntemann's book.

There aren't many non-Windows Intel assembly books on the market, the vast majority pretend nothing but Windows exists. So this book definitely has a place because it targets Linux and goes with the AT&T syntax.

These two books (this and Duntemann's) are not one or the other. nasm is probably the leading non-gnu assembler for Linux and BSD. If you get both these books you'll have an excellent start on x86 programming covering all the major issues from both the Intel (nasm) and AT&T (gnu) styles.
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Old 26th December 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ephemera View Post
i wound highly recommend this book for anyone wanting to learn assembly:

'Assembly-Language-Step-step-Programming' by Jeff Duntemann
That is a *nice* book for x86 assembly, in three versions since 1992. It still doesn't cover 64 bit though, and it's long overdue. However, it's a good introduction to x86 on Linux with nasm and will get you started in that environment.
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Old 26th December 2012
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I love "Assembler дла DOS, Windows и UNIX" by Зубков Сергей Бладимирович ISBN 5-94074-259-9. It's complete crap if you want to learn assembler on Unix, but it has great assembler reference. And I learned really much from coding asm in DOS with it.

I also have "IBM PC Assembly Language and Programming" by Peter Abel, which I haven't read, but it's a very good assembler instruction reference.


For asm on UNIX, here's a good read:
http://www.int80h.org/

Also, here's my asm stuff for university: https://github.com/graudeejs/asm4BSD
There are some (I think) nice sample code for FreeBSD (32bit), also there are fasm header for *BSD and script to generate newer versions.
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