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Old 12th September 2008
rex rex is offline
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Default Execute a command during login

I'm in process of selecting a window manager for one of my old desktops. I came across wm2. It is great. only problem is as it can't be configured I need to find a way to execute a command at login time to set the wallpaper.

Is there a way I can do that?
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Old 12th September 2008
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You can use a shell script to start X and the window manager and complete any other commands you would like afterward. You can use feh to set wallpaper.
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Old 12th September 2008
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on my system X starts automatically and I use slim as login manager.
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Old 12th September 2008
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An example of X startup script (~/.xsession)

Code:
#!/bin/sh
linux-opera -notrayicon &
pidgin &
gnome-terminal --geometry=126x40+0+0 & 
fluxbox
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Old 12th September 2008
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You can always check how your login manager knows what program to execute (e.g. wm2) and set it at a custom script. This is basically what ~/.xinitrc (X) or ~/.xsession (XDM) is for I think, but it's been a long time since I setup stuff that way...



My system uses GDM and a custom session file defined as executing a init.sh script in my home directory, instead of a window manager directly. Where ~/init.sh serves to execute a few programs in the background (e.g. my wall paper rotator, pidgin&, etc) and finally launches my window manager: blackbox, and being a humble shell script owned by my user, I can edit it later without being root lol.

While still working essentially the same way as X.
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