DaemonForums  

Go Back   DaemonForums > OpenBSD > OpenBSD General

OpenBSD General Other questions regarding OpenBSD which do not fit in any of the categories below.

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1   (View Single Post)  
Old 5th October 2008
Timmy66 Timmy66 is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 6
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default Sendmail

Hi all,

What steps do I need to take in order to get sendmail working on my webserver? I want to send and recive email from my workstation and I've got a domainname and a static ip address.

Thanks in advance
Reply With Quote
  #2   (View Single Post)  
Old 5th October 2008
robbak's Avatar
robbak robbak is offline
Real Name: Robert Backhaus
VPN Cryptographer
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: North Queensland, Australia
Posts: 366
Thanked 40 Times in 39 Posts
Default

Not much: indeed it should be working out-of-the-box. When you try, what fails?

(edit: you may want to read my post Using mail.... Some of the masquerades in there may make things neater, but should not be required.)
__________________
The only dumb question is a question not asked.
The only dumb answer is an answer not given.

Last edited by robbak; 5th October 2008 at 07:25 AM.
Reply With Quote
  #3   (View Single Post)  
Old 5th October 2008
J65nko J65nko is offline
Administrator
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Budel - the Netherlands
Posts: 3,116
Thanked 182 Times in 149 Posts
Default

From the afterboot man page
Code:
   Sendmail
     OpenBSD ships with a default /etc/mail/localhost.cf file that will work
     for simple installations; it was generated from openbsd-localhost.mc in
     /usr/share/sendmail/cf.  Please see /usr/share/sendmail/README and
     /usr/share/doc/smm/08.sendmailop/op.me for information on generating your
     own sendmail configuration files.  For the default installation, sendmail
     is configured to only accept connections from the local host and to not
     accept connections on any external interfaces.  This makes it possible to
     send mail locally, but not receive mail from remote servers, which is
     ideal if you have one central incoming mail machine and several clients.
     To cause sendmail to accept external network connections, modify the
     sendmail_flags variable in /etc/rc.conf.local to use the
     /etc/mail/sendmail.cf file in accordance with the comments therein. This
     file was generated from openbsd-proto.mc.

     Note that sendmail now also listens on port 587 by default.  This is to
     implement the RFC 2476 message submission protocol.  You may disable this
     via the no_default_msa option in your sendmail .mc file.  See
     /usr/share/sendmail/README for more information.
From "/etc/rc.conf"
Code:
# For normal use: "-L sm-mta -bd -q30m", and note there is a cron job
sendmail_flags="-L sm-mta -C/etc/mail/localhost.cf -bd -q30m"
__________________
You don't need to be a genius to debug a pf.conf firewall ruleset, you just need the guts to run tcpdump
Reply With Quote
  #4   (View Single Post)  
Old 12th October 2008
roundkat roundkat is offline
Shell Scout
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 107
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Timmy66 View Post
Hi all,

What steps do I need to take in order to get sendmail working on my webserver? I want to send and recive email from my workstation and I've got a domainname and a static ip address.

Thanks in advance
To receive email.
You will also need to make sure you have an MX record in place..

If not, once you get Sendmail (I use Postfix--much easier IMHO)
configured you will be able to send email but not receive it unless
you have an MX record in place..

It would help us if we knew what your final goal was..

hth
rk
__________________
All posts sent on ReCycled Electrons...
Reply With Quote
  #5   (View Single Post)  
Old 16th October 2008
JavaUser JavaUser is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by roundkat View Post
I use Postfix--much easier IMHO
I agree 100% on that. I don't know why Sendmail is even maintained or shipped anymore. Postfix is saner and easier. Postfix and Exim now dominate the non-MS MTA market, for good reason.
Reply With Quote
  #6   (View Single Post)  
Old 17th October 2008
DutchDaemon's Avatar
DutchDaemon DutchDaemon is offline
Real Name: Ben
Spam Refugee
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Posts: 337
Thanked 32 Times in 30 Posts
Default

Sendmail is an acquired taste. Have been using it since < 8.8. Wizardry with m4 files is mandatory, but it's _very_ versatile. Learning curve may be quite steep, but that doesn't make it bad ..
Reply With Quote
  #7   (View Single Post)  
Old 17th October 2008
Carpetsmoker's Avatar
Carpetsmoker Carpetsmoker is offline
Real Name: Martin
Old man from scene 24
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Eindhoven, Netherlands
Posts: 2,051
Thanked 198 Times in 156 Posts
Default

Quote:
Sendmail is an acquired taste.
Right, and so is cyanide.
__________________
UNIX was not designed to stop you from doing stupid things, because that would also stop you from doing clever things.
Reply With Quote
  #8   (View Single Post)  
Old 17th October 2008
drhowarddrfine drhowarddrfine is offline
VPN Cryptographer
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 358
Thanked 9 Times in 8 Posts
Default

Hey! Don't make fun of cyanide until you've tried it. You never hear complaints from those who have actually tried it, have you?
Reply With Quote
  #9   (View Single Post)  
Old 17th October 2008
JavaUser JavaUser is offline
New User
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 5
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by DutchDaemon View Post
Sendmail is an acquired taste. Have been using it since < 8.8. Wizardry with m4 files is mandatory, but it's _very_ versatile.
Someone should not have to be a wizard with some obscure language (m4) which is only used in one particular application (sendmail) to be able to configure an ordinary mail server. That's why sendmail is not so widely used anymore. No wizardry is needed for Postfix.
Reply With Quote
Old 17th October 2008
DutchDaemon's Avatar
DutchDaemon DutchDaemon is offline
Real Name: Ben
Spam Refugee
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Posts: 337
Thanked 32 Times in 30 Posts
Default

You all sound like Ubuntu users now .. "BSD is too hard!"
Reply With Quote
Old 19th October 2008
unicyclist unicyclist is offline
Fdisk Soldier
 
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 54
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Default

Here is a page that really helped me with sendmail:
http://www.sacrideo.us/Sacrificum_De...il_openbsd.txt

This may not help the OP
Reply With Quote
Old 19th October 2008
bsddaemon bsddaemon is offline
Slack Daemon
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 35
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Default

Ironically, the first ever project in my Unix life was Sendmail configuration. It was a project at school in Unix subject. In this project, we were acting like "hosting provider", and required to install, config, secure and maintain dns, mail, file and web services.

At that time, I didnt know Sendmail is that hard

Sounds like I did a good job, havent got any customer's complaint. Oh wait, who is my customer?
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
sendmail host name lookup failure ducu_00 General software and network 9 21st January 2009 02:42 AM
sendmail dont boot dejabu18 FreeBSD Ports and Packages 0 8th October 2008 02:07 PM
sendmail vs qmail vs postfix vs exim graudeejs General software and network 6 22nd July 2008 03:25 PM
Using sendmail in a cron job erehwon OpenBSD General 6 15th May 2008 09:03 PM
Sendmail, issues... pcfxer FreeBSD General 2 8th May 2008 10:07 AM


All times are GMT. The time now is 09:57 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content copyright © 2007-2010, the authors
Daemon image copyright ©1988, Marshall Kirk McKusick