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Programming C, bash, Python, Perl, PHP, Java, you name it.

View Poll Results: favorite programming language?
Asm 19 12.67%
C 56 37.33%
C++ 32 21.33%
C# 7 4.67%
Java 13 8.67%
Javascript 5 3.33%
Perl 28 18.67%
PHP 30 20.00%
Ruby 11 7.33%
Python 34 22.67%
Shell 25 16.67%
Awk 12 8.00%
Others: Tcl, Erlang, Haskell, Ocaml, D, Forth ... 19 12.67%
Multiple Choice Poll. Voters: 150. You may not vote on this poll

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Old 29th November 2008
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I actually find myself scripting on the command-line an awful lot. It's quick and efficient for me. This makes bash a pretty useful and powerful login shell.

As far as markup languages not being languages, I don't see how that would be true. Markup languages are inherently defined as languages. They just aren't programming languages.
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Old 29th November 2008
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And this thread is about programming languages ;-)


Personally on shell script, if it doesn't work in shells/v7sh, I tend to switch to Perl or Python.
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Old 3rd January 2009
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In the past I have used ksh and perl. I really like perl. I have been out of computer for 6 years and have come back. Even got a $200 laptop running pcbsd 7.0.

I want to become a programmer. I have studied some Java and I like really much because of the libraries and graphics. But I find that writing programs in java takes longer than say perl.

But, if I was just learning how to become a programmer what would be better to concentrate on Java, Python Ruby or C ? I am asking say job wise.

I want to write my own daemons and applications and graphs.

Thanks
Chris
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Old 4th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chrisd View Post
But, if I was just learning how to become a programmer what would be better to concentrate on Java, Python Ruby or C ? I am asking say job wise.
This depends upon what you want to do professionally, & what kind of jobs you are likely to find in your area if you do not want to move elsewhere.

Having said that & not knowing anything more than what has been posted, I would say there are five languages to have a passing knowledge of at this time:
  • Perl and/or Python for scripting needs ranging from simple to more complex. When wanting to create database applications, one of the first tools reached for should be Perl or possibly Python. Given that you already stated some exposure to Perl, learn the language & learn it well. Perl is quite flexible & sophisticated. It is used in a number of applications be it database, Web, or sysadmin work. Read, study, & understand the various Perl titles published by O'Reilly.
  • Be it that you already mentioned some Java exposure, learn this language well too. You have given no information as to what work is available in your area, but quite likely, Java work can be found.
  • Knowledge of C is important if you want to become a sysadmin or want to do lower level systems work, but systems-level work may or may not be available in your area.
  • Anyone who wants to understand Unix or customize it to their own liking needs to learn shell scripting -- simply for the reason that a Bourne-compatible shell is most likely to be available on any Unix system encountered.
  • Lastly, while not necessarily classified a general purpose language as the above choices, learning SQL & how to administer & use databases such as MySQL & Postgres will pay off in time.
The deeper you understand these languages & their uses, the more employable you will become. The key word here is "deep". Having knowledge of multiple languages also helps because this means you will not be as myopic as those that only understand one way of solving a problem.

If you can provide more information, you may get more (relevant) responses.

Last edited by ocicat; 4th January 2009 at 03:58 AM.
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Old 4th January 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nero View Post
Laugh as much as you wish, but I still use Mumps, Snobol, FORTRAN and APL for little home projects. I'm turning 64 next week, by way of explanation. 'Never have understood why GOTO is such a bad thing. Cheers to your choices from an old fart.
Never used Mumps but spent my fair share of time with the rest of what you mentioned.

S/390 assembler is my favorite and most used language. I also like SNOBOL, APL, Ada (haven't used it much but it is waaay cool) and PL/I. I actually used to write quite a bit of 390 object code so for me assembler is still HLL

Still haven't learned a language worth a damn for UNIX programming but maybe Ada will be enough there.
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Old 4th January 2009
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> Never have understood why GOTO is such a bad thing

I agree. I suppose GOTO must feel like a natural way to branch to an assembly programmer.
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Old 4th January 2009
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If you want to dig into UNIX programming Randux, learn C and buy a copy of W. Richard Stevens best works ;-)

but don't forget Bourne Shell, SED, AWK, and Perl along the way.
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Old 4th January 2009
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I can code in C if somebody holds a gun to my head, but they can't make me wanna. It just looks ugly to me, and thirty five years after I first saw it I still feel the same way.

LOL Ephemera, GOTO is the ONLY way to branch!
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Old 5th January 2009
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Thanks Randux,

I know PERL pretty well and shell is of course a given. I think I will concentrate on Java. I am reading a great book on it and it can do almost anything on the computer. I'll see where it takes me.

THe book I am reading is "Introduction to Programming in Java" by Sedgewick. He states that the principles in the book apply to all programming languages not just java.

I guess after I have studied the book for a while and developed a style then I can study something else.

From what I have had limited exposure to , php looks similar sytanx wise to Java. I dont like C too much, never have. Loved PERL back in the day, and I really like Java so maybe I will stick with that for now

Also for now, I need to go to Labor Ready and see if I can get a day job :+)
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Old 5th January 2009
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I don't think anything in Java applies to all programming languages, because a) Java is not a programming language and b) OO is a solution looking for a problem. There, that ought to be good for some discussion LOL.

Sorry if I got off the track I was just responding to the other posters in your thread. You can't use S/390 assembler on NIX and I wasn't recommending it.

Then again maybe you are responding to another poster.
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Old 11th January 2009
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If Java is not a programming language, thats only because it is a VM So its a whole computing device minus io devices


And it must be connected to all other languages by the theory of six degrees of kevin bacon.
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Old 13th January 2009
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well said
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Old 29th March 2009
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I use C++, NASM ASM, Ruby, XHTML, CSS, SQL (Postgre) and Javascript. I am learning RoR at the moment.

C++ is used for normal application programming, I know it has a lot of bloat that isn't needed, but I still think it's a great language. I prefer the I/O method than C's. It seems fast compared to some newer languages as well. The amount of APIs out there for it makes it compatible. I don't really use OOP that much, but I like the option to be there.

Ruby is used for making inefficient code fast. If I need to make something fast, or I want to automate anything quickly that's what I use. It's just so easy; it seems like the new BASIC to me. It's so slow though....

NASM ASM is my favorite. I wouldn't use it for anything big or anything that requires a GUI, but for certain things, it rocks. Shame that I have to rewrite bits of the code every time I change OS, but this is just system calls and stuff. I'm intending on writing 64bit assembly soon.

I made sure I took the time to learn a few web languages, since it looks like the web will become bigger and bigger. I have practically no knowledge of shell scripting (I use ruby for everything like that).
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Old 29th March 2009
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Object Oriented Programming is just one solution to a common problem: until you get into the buzzword loving noodle heads or the over zealous morons, I've always found it just a syntactical style and mental model to do what decent application or library code should do anyway (only I prefer something more functional).

With how slow most Java apps are, why bother when there is Lisp and Python ;-).



@SunSpyda with NASM and most modern OSes, you should be able to make it a bit portable between OSes, so what needs rewriting is a little more minimalist.
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Old 31st March 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TerryP View Post
Object Oriented Programming is just one solution to a common problem: until you get into the buzzword loving noodle heads or the over zealous morons, I've always found it just a syntactical style and mental model to do what decent application or library code should do anyway (only I prefer something more functional).

With how slow most Java apps are, why bother when there is Lisp and Python ;-).



@SunSpyda with NASM and most modern OSes, you should be able to make it a bit portable between OSes, so what needs rewriting is a little more minimalist.
Thanks for the advice and the link =)

I am still learning the ASM, so portability is something I need to work on.

I don't think OOP is as useful as people make out, but it certainly has it's uses every now and then.

I know what you mean about Java, but to be fair Java is quite a bit faster these days.... But it's still pretty slow.
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Old 31st March 2009
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Maybe a bit off-topic, but can anyone recommend a good book for programming in assembly?
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Old 31st March 2009
SunSpyda SunSpyda is offline
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Errr... ASM lacks good tutorials/books, and the ones that are out there are all for different syntaxes, assemblers, platforms etc.

I *personally* would recommend using NASM, because it's popular and portable.

I'm only giving links to Intel ASM (NASM is Intel syntax), because that's the main one in ASM.

A lot of these are for Linux, because there are so few BSD ones. If you code it right, it should work on both....

Unfortunately, all my ASM links are on my other PC, so I will post them when I can get my hands on them.
Anyway, here are a few pretty random ASM links....

http://www.phiral.net/papers.htm
http://www.int80h.org/bsdasm/
http://www.masm32.com/board/index.php?
http://www.programmersheaven.com/tag...mbly/Articles/
http://sourceforge.net/forum/?group_id=6208
http://www.drpaulcarter.com/pcasm/
http://docs.cs.up.ac.za/programming/asm/derick_tut/
http://asm.sourceforge.net/howto/Assembly-HOWTO.html
http://leto.net/writing/nasm.php

I'll post more as I think of more =)

You should browse around a few torrent sites, there might be some ASM ebooks there. Demonoid is pretty good for ebooks.

Last edited by SunSpyda; 31st March 2009 at 07:19 PM.
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Old 31st March 2009
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Yeah, I found `tutorials' and stuff, but that's not quite what I'm looking for ...
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Old 31st March 2009
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The only book I know of is programming from the ground up; it uses GAS and goes through the basics of programming by way of Linux X86 assembly (AT&T syntax, Linux calling convention; available as PDF). The tutorial in the FreeBSD developers handbook thing / int80h website (uses NASM) gives a good enough concept of the language basics -> especially the differences in calling conventions. Book wise, the only books I've heard about *were* good back in the days of TASM/MASM on MS-DOS. Have you tried Amazon Carpetsmoker?


When I was experimenting in asm, I was using programming from the ground up for GAS code examples under Linux, and the NASM manual for a language reference use with FreeBSD lol. (Intel should still have immense volumes of documentation available on the instruction set and various processors). The big issue, how the heck do you invoke a system call that expects a pointer to a C 'struct'. The regular programming tasks should be easy enough to figure out with a decently documented assembler and hardware documentation.
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Old 13th April 2009
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Tack on another one for (Common) Lisp!

Heh - at the ONLinux conference in October, I was chatting with a fellow whose language of choice was COBOL, he asked what mine was, I tell him "Common Lisp" and his jaw nearly hit the floor.

I find it odd - on occasion when I get into a conversation with somebody who programs, and they know what Lisp is, they almost respond in fear when I drop the notice that it's my language of choice.
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