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Old 5th July 2009
nihonto nihonto is offline
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Default Nicer Prompt with ksh on 5.0

Hi there,

as I am trying out NetBSD 5.0 I would like to use a little more functional prompt in the ksh. My problem: ksh under NetBSD is fairly different from ksh under OpenBSD.

While under OpenBSD all I had to do was putting something like:

Code:
export PS1='$PWD $ '
in my ~.profile and

Code:
XTerm*loginShell: true
in my ~.Xdefaults, under NetBSD this doesn't work at all.

So, I know it's a question on a very low level, but I haven't found any working hint up to now: Can you give me a hint on how I can change the prompt of the ksh?
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Old 6th July 2009
BSDfan666 BSDfan666 is offline
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Both NetBSD and OpenBSD have implementations based on pdksh, each has their own customizations.

PS1 on NetBSD's ksh doesn't support the special backslash characters that are supported by OpenBSD's ksh and GNU's bash.. but you're not making use of them.

Make sure you reload the .Xdefaults file, or restart X.
$ xrdb -load ~/.Xdefaults

Hope that helps.
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Old 6th July 2009
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s0xxx s0xxx is offline
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Do the command in the shell and it will become efective immediatelly.
Code:
$ cd /usr/src
$ 
$ export PS1='$USER@$HOST [$PWD] $'
s0xxx@nbsd5 [/usr/src] $
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Old 6th July 2009
nihonto nihonto is offline
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Hey folks, thanks for your advice!

s0xxx, I put this in my ~.profile:

Code:
export PS1='@$PWD $'
But now I get this prompt:

Quote:
sushisushi@/home/nihonto $
The hostname ("-s") is doubled. Any idea why?
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Old 7th July 2009
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Actually no idea. You don't even have the $HOST in PS1 (if what you wrote is correct). Try logging out, and in again.
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Old 7th July 2009
nihonto nihonto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s0xxx View Post
Actually no idea.
So now we are two

Quote:
Originally Posted by s0xxx View Post
You don't even have the $HOST in PS1 (if what you wrote is correct). Try logging out, and in again.
I tried logging out and logging in - it doesn't help.

You are right, I don't have the $HOST in PS1 because $HOST has been set by default. The reason? I think, it's because I have the following entry in my /etc/rc.conf:

Quote:
hostname=sushi.my.domain
This is because afterboot (8) says:

Quote:
Check hostname
Use the hostname command to verify that the name of your machine is cor-
rect. See the man page for hostname(1) if it needs to be changed. You
will also need to change the contents of the ``hostname'' variable in
/etc/rc.conf or edit the /etc/myname file to have it stick around for the
next reboot.
Since then the prompt switched from simple "$" to "sushi$".

So, was this wrong?
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Old 8th July 2009
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Are you saying that since you put that entry in rc.conf the prompt has started showing hostname in it?
Setting hostname in rc.conf should have nothing to do with setting PS1 prompt. Check your .profile, .kshrc or similar for any entry that you might have forgot, concerning PS1.
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Old 8th July 2009
nihonto nihonto is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s0xxx View Post
Setting hostname in rc.conf should have nothing to do with setting PS1 prompt.
Well, in this case it does! I just made the experiment and deleted "hostname=sushi.my.domain" from /etc/rc.conf. As a result, postfix complained about the now missing hostname on the reboot and the prompt changed from "sushi$" to "$" (with and without Xorg running).

Funny thing, isn't it?
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Old 12th October 2009
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I was facing the same issue here, where my hostname was getting arbitrarily inserted into the prompt.

The issue, i found out was the ".shrc" file in the home directory. This file pulls in another file "/etc/shrc". If you have a look at "/etc/shrc", you'll find it performs a lot of tomfoolery with PS1 (including inserting the hostname), editor keybindings, etc.

I didn't find anything useful being done by these scripts, so i renamed ".shrc" to ".shrc_old". That gave me back the prompt i wanted (without the hostname), and as a bonus my keybindings of the editor to vi also got picked up instead of being ignored.

FYI,

$ uname -spr
NetBSD 5.0.1 x86_64
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