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Old 2nd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Ok. I got the Apple notebook to work again. Since the problem isn't depending on whether I produce network traffic or not, I decided to just connect and let the computer doing nothing, which results in the following traffic on rum0:

Code:
14:27:32.413035 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         003d 756f 75ce 1cff f0bc b201 7181 9ed8
                         d685 b885 2703 446b b0d9 803b 24a1 25df
                         3b00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
14:27:32.417492 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0092 b451 92ae 8c29 5099 eeae 9461 d920
                         f1f2 d57d d772 438f 776a 9770 7111 7c84
                         b200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00f0 f57b 42d4 9854 7f49 321c bfa2 8f46
                         b000 1630 1401
14:27:32.417597 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         013d 756f 75ce 1cff f0bc b201 7181 9ed8
                         d685 b885 2703 446b b0d9 803b 24a1 25df
                         3b00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00a5 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         001d a190 22da 69ff a25b 0593 7723 ac61
                         ba00 50cd 4164
14:27:32.421482 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0192 b451 92ae 8c29 5099 eeae 9461 d920
                         f1f2 d57d d772 438f 776a 9770 7111 7c84
                         b200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         006a 0338 d494 eaa6 8d62 de89 102e e48a
                         6100 00
14:27:32.422297 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:32.821314 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:33.220560 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:33.623806 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:34.032548 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:34.032668 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:34.032737 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:34.032748 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0806 42: arp reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
14:27:34.441219 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:34.822009 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:35.221007 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:36.041028 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:02 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.2: igmp leave 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
14:27:36.041121 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
14:27:36.280442 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.63793 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:36.548723 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.63793 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:36.818514 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.63793 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:39.549947 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.60856 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:39.816475 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.60856 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:40.086317 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.60856 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
14:27:41.241586 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0010 592e 4b5d ab13 6a8a 5468 a1bb 92dc
                         d2a1 5606 774a ca79 21ee 1f36 7a5b 513c
                         4800 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
14:27:41.246044 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         000e 25f5 26ea d5a7 3c46 5932 ec4a c83a
                         8296 ddcd 2d9f 2898 7993 e4c9 7d2e f970
                         5b00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00cb 81c0 6c6f c386 ba0b fa88 e42b bf4f
                         2300 1630 1401
14:27:41.246155 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0110 592e 4b5d ab13 6a8a 5468 a1bb 92dc
                         d2a1 5606 774a ca79 21ee 1f36 7a5b 513c
                         4800 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00b7 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         001f bc0f b82e f53d b559 7a1e 20ce 00f5
                         3200 5007 189a
14:27:41.250146 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         010e 25f5 26ea d5a7 3c46 5932 ec4a c83a
                         8296 ddcd 2d9f 2898 7993 e4c9 7d2e f970
                         5b00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         009a b21b 2d7f 3cab dcd3 f298 520b adc6
                         4a00 00
14:27:41.251203 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:41.647413 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:42.046337 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:42.445851 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:42.845076 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:42.845253 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:42.845302 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0806 42: arp reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
14:27:43.243834 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:43.642860 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:43.972748 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
14:27:44.045316 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:44.454036 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:53.471305 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         00a5 1a2b 8e57 cac6 0cfa 9719 f0bc ce58
                         805d fa5f 3d8d 43e5 085f c824 4256 11da
                         a800 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
14:27:53.475767 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0017 31bd c74d e191 981d 0ec5 600f 0791
                         74b4 0962 9072 e2e2 59f4 c1e2 0590 c709
                         4200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         000f c9a1 0030 a0fe ad80 1872 677c 6053
                         2c00 1630 1401
14:27:53.475869 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         01a5 1a2b 8e57 cac6 0cfa 9719 f0bc ce58
                         805d fa5f 3d8d 43e5 085f c824 4256 11da
                         a800 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00c2 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         007a 46ed 25fd a8cf 3680 bba8 ad29 32bd
                         e700 5014 0602
14:27:53.481258 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0117 31bd c74d e191 981d 0ec5 600f 0791
                         74b4 0962 9072 e2e2 59f4 c1e2 0590 c709
                         4200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         007f 93f3 7e55 fc09 0e5b 50ce ed15 b160
                         df00 00
14:27:53.482552 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:53.875884 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:54.275093 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
14:27:54.674356 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:55.079843 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:55.079999 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:55.080070 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:55.080082 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0806 42: arp reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
14:27:55.488567 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:55.875358 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:56.276353 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
14:27:57.089293 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:02 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.2: igmp leave 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
14:27:57.089439 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
14:28:00.533902 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
^C
101 packets received by filter
0 packets dropped by kernel
Strange are these big hexdump packets which appear when the client connects. At least I can't see any evidence here that might indicate a problem why the client suddenly disconnects. Maybe I should run tcpdump on the client too and see what happens?
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Old 2nd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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And here's the tcpdump from the client:

Code:
14:40:12.215883 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 135: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 117
14:40:12.215900 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
14:40:12.219956 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
14:40:12.219977 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 193: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 175
14:40:12.220487 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:12.620561 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:13.020662 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:13.420787 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:13.821017 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:13.821408 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:13.825223 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:13.825279 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, length 28
14:40:14.225363 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:14.625490 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:15.025592 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:15.834600 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:02, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.2: igmp leave 224.0.0.251
14:40:15.834659 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:fb, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp v2 report 224.0.0.251
14:40:16.072058 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.51625 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
14:40:16.342945 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.51625 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
14:40:16.613281 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.51625 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
14:40:19.347260 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.54508 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
14:40:19.617561 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.54508 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
14:40:19.887840 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.54508 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST

break

14:40:21.081885 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 135: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 117
14:40:21.081902 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
14:40:21.085829 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:21.086021 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
14:40:21.086042 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 193: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 175
14:40:21.485940 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:21.886049 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
14:40:22.286175 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:22.530218 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:fb, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp v2 report 224.0.0.251
14:40:22.686436 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:22.686817 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:22.689952 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, length 28
14:40:23.086030 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:23.486122 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:23.886227 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
14:40:24.286350 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
Nothing very special here too.
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Old 2nd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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You don't have to post over 1400 lines of tcpdump output.

The first thing you have to make sure is: Do I see the outgoing request packets and the incoming answers from a wired network host in those xterms? If something gets blocked it will show up in the tcpdump pflog0 xterm
That is to confirm that the basic debugging strategy works.

After confirmation repeat using a wireless client.
Now
Code:
13:17:00.243508 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0800 70: 192.168.2.254 > 192.168.2.99: icmp: host 17.149.36.197 unreachable
[code]If the firewall has been blocking does, the tcpdump -eni pflog0 xterm should show this type of blocked packets. Does it? If it does it means your pf.conf needs to be adjusted.

Analysis of the first couple of packets
Code:
13:16:40.908888 0800 113: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0
[1n] [1au] ANY (Cache flush)? touchPod.local. (71)

A request to the 224.0.0.0 multicast block

13:16:40.911770 0800 91: 192.168.2.99.57739 > 83.169.185.161.53:
59379+ A? safebrowsing.clients.google.com. (49)

A DNS request source port 57739 -> dest port 53

13:16:40.919842 0800 211: 83.169.185.161.53 > 192.168.2.99.57739:
59379 7/0/0 CNAME clients.l.google.com.,[|domain]

The answer source port 53 ->  destination port 5773 
So these DNS requests have no trouble passing

13:16:41.157010 0800 113: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0
[1n] [1au] ANY? touchPod.local. (71)
Looks like a DNS request packet to the 224.0.0.0 multicast block

13:16:41.261481 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.99
An ARP inquiry

13:16:41.406013 0800 113: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0 [1n] [1au] ANY? touchPod.local. (71)
13:16:41.655503 0800 123: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0*- [0q] 2/0/0 (Cache flush) A 192.168.2.99, (81)
Looks like  DNS request packets to the 224.0.0.0 multicast block

13:16:41.661492 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.99
An ARP inquiry

13:16:42.652756 0800 123: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0*- [0q] 2/0/0 (Cache flush) A 192.168.2.99, (81)
13:16:44.667696 0800 123: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 224.0.0.251.5353: 0*- [0q] 2/0/0 (Cache flush) A 192.168.2.99, (81)
Repeated cache flush requests to 224.0.0.0 multicast block

13:16:44.667828 0800 44: 192.168.2.99.5353 > 192.168.2.254.5351:[|domain]
A truncated (by tcpdump)  DNS packet 

13:16:44.667962 0800 70: 192.168.2.254 > 192.168.2.99: icmp: 192.168.2.254 udp port 5351 unreachable
An icmp message informing 192.168.2.99 that udp prt 5351 cannot be reached 


13:16:44.668086 0800 170: 192.168.2.99.61471 > 192.168.2.254.1900: udp 128
13:16:44.668155 0800 70: 192.168.2.254 > 192.168.2.99: icmp: 192.168.2.254 udp port 1900 unreachable
A SSDP packet  and a message informing the sender that port 1900 cannot be reached
Open up ports 1900 and 5351 for UDP traffic and retry
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Old 2nd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
Open up ports 1900 and 5351 for UDP traffic and retry
What do you mean? Should I forward/nat the ports to the outside or should I just pass in on rum0 from blabla to port { 1900, 5351 } ?
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Old 2nd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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In the pf.conf, I suggested and which I hope you are using, it is as simple as:
Code:
UDP_PORTS = '{domain 1900 5351}'
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Last edited by J65nko; 2nd January 2010 at 03:22 PM. Reason: I forgot those "{" and "}"
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Old 2nd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Ok. I am allowing the traffic as you said.

router:
Code:
# tcpdump -eni rum0
tcpdump: listening on rum0, link-type EN10MB
16:16:04.818278 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         007b c293 a1a9 0e55 ac19 4bc3 3578 cf33
                         5923 99b0 8aa9 24f0 51cb 1d1c c72e d9a6
                         3200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
16:16:04.822727 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         008b 1bae a891 9873 4d3e 262d 7c85 4397
                         b737 4246 1860 619f b161 1f8a 6dcf 92bb
                         9900 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00cb 3b26 cb91 7220 e1f5 a872 38ea 3097
                         6f00 1630 1401
16:16:04.822830 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         017b c293 a1a9 0e55 ac19 4bc3 3578 cf33
                         5923 99b0 8aa9 24f0 51cb 1d1c c72e d9a6
                         3200 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0001 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00e3 c435 eb3c 4e44 a62a 9f6a 9b45 3e76
                         c600 50ff 2eb4
16:16:04.826968 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         018b 1bae a891 9873 4d3e 262d 7c85 4397
                         b737 4246 1860 619f b161 1f8a 6dcf 92bb
                         9900 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0046 f35d d255 2d7c 9c17 cd49 42b7 9a9a
                         0b00 00
16:16:04.830017 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:05.225046 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:05.624050 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:06.024032 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:06.432541 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:06.432688 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:06.432779 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:06.432791 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0806 42: arp reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
16:16:06.841232 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:07.222771 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:07.623250 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:08.451736 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:02 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.2: igmp leave 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
16:16:08.451859 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
16:16:08.729106 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:08.998872 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:09.268674 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:11.825206 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 01:00:5e:00:00:fb 0800 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp nreport 224.0.0.251 [ttl 1]
16:16:11.997100 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:12.267852 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:12.536456 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0800 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: udp 50
16:16:13.672245 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0011 76e4 d9fe 5038 7b65 a1aa 3e32 040c
                         4fb5 56ab 1179 381a 3d59 4d18 8706 25bc
                         ae00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
16:16:13.676962 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0068 5414 5c97 dec4 a3d7 e13e 001c 2cac
                         b669 b5b1 6ea1 c047 c2fc d009 7d6f 73d3
                         4600 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         006e 7ee2 88cc c251 7286 073f 8121 a4c9
                         a500 1630 1401
16:16:13.677065 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0111 76e4 d9fe 5038 7b65 a1aa 3e32 040c
                         4fb5 56ab 1179 381a 3d59 4d18 8706 25bc
                         ae00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0014 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00e2 ff6e 1b64 0821 8e29 8243 6d50 d253
                         6700 5019 5fed
16:16:13.680966 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0168 5414 5c97 dec4 a3d7 e13e 001c 2cac
                         b669 b5b1 6ea1 c047 c2fc d009 7d6f 73d3
                         4600 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00ae 61cf 6f10 4362 6d52 7467 7922 f004
                         3a00 00
16:16:13.682790 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:14.095521 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:14.481261 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
16:16:14.880498 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:15.279779 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:15.279936 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:15.279987 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 0806 42: arp reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy
16:16:15.678772 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:16.077749 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:16.477014 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:16.876293 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101
16:16:25.870315 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0200 8a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0086 131b f042 d636 11b2 dafd 37d0 4f07
                         56f0 35e1 89d0 5d74 2a93 4ece b270 f902
                         4f00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 00
16:16:25.874781 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 135: 
                         0103 0075 0201 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0053 6240 9743 afb0 b2b3 ea4c 3f6f cec2
                         3e65 80de a789 6afc ce63 2b4a 5f67 591d
                         3500 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         008c 7714 30fe af68 890e f63b 9165 8618
                         d000 1630 1401
16:16:25.874881 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx 888e 193: 
                         0103 00af 0213 ca00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0186 131b f042 d636 11b2 dafd 37d0 4f07
                         56f0 35e1 89d0 5d74 2a93 4ece b270 f902
                         4f00 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         001e 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         005a ff46 45ea 5560 4d39 1fe4 3a90 bb93
                         2d00 5054 4137
16:16:25.878781 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy 888e 113: 
                         0103 005f 0203 0a00 1000 0000 0000 0000
                         0153 6240 9743 afb0 b2b3 ea4c 3f6f cec2
                         3e65 80de a789 6afc ce63 2b4a 5f67 591d
                         3500 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000 0000
                         00e5 7e21 1369 14a9 b24b 0023 e748 3a58
                         e400 00
16:16:25.880610 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff 0806 42: arp who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0
^C
44 packets received by filter
0 packets dropped by kernel
client:
Code:
:# tcpdump -eni en1
tcpdump: WARNING: en1: no IPv4 address assigned
tcpdump: verbose output suppressed, use -v or -vv for full protocol decode
listening on en1, link-type EN10MB (Ethernet), capture size 65535 bytes
16:19:18.623926 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 135: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 117
16:19:18.623944 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:18.628216 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:18.628238 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 193: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 175
16:19:18.628467 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:19.028548 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:19.428753 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:19.828854 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:20.229426 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:20.229883 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:20.230773 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:20.249442 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, length 28
16:19:20.630836 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:21.030975 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:21.431104 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:22.263078 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:02, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.2: igmp leave 224.0.0.251
16:19:22.263150 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:fb, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp v2 report 224.0.0.251
16:19:22.541029 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:22.811397 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:23.081914 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.55026 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:25.644632 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > 01:00:5e:00:00:fb, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 46: 192.168.2.101 > 224.0.0.251: igmp v2 report 224.0.0.251
16:19:25.816740 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:26.087102 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:26.357518 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype IPv4 (0x0800), length 92: 192.168.2.101.64321 > 192.168.2.255.137: NBT UDP PACKET(137): QUERY; REQUEST; BROADCAST
16:19:27.499409 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 135: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 117
16:19:27.499426 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:27.503625 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:27.503648 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 193: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 175
16:19:27.506847 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:27.907069 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:28.307199 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:28.707342 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:29.107630 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:29.108080 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.254 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:29.111133 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Reply 192.168.2.254 is-at yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, length 28
16:19:29.507371 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:29.907484 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:30.307619 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:30.707738 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 169.254.255.255 tell 192.168.2.101, length 28
16:19:39.726657 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 135: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 117
16:19:39.726675 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:39.728760 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > ff:ff:ff:ff:ff:ff, ethertype ARP (0x0806), length 42: Request who-has 192.168.2.101 tell 0.0.0.0, length 28
16:19:39.730851 xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx > yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 113: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 95
16:19:39.730874 yy:yy:yy:yy:yy:yy > xx:xx:xx:xx:xx:xx, ethertype EAPOL (0x888e), length 193: EAPOL key (3) v1, len 175
^C
44 packets captured
44 packets received by filter
0 packets dropped by kernel
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Old 2nd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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Join Date: May 2008
Location: Budel - the Netherlands
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Default

Actually I am not interested in the client (only the clients packets arriving on the WLAN interface), but that en1 interface doesn't have an IP address
Code:
tcpdump: WARNING: en1: no IPv4 address assigned
As you know without IP address it is difficult to communicate.

I suggest we continue with the iPhone

Do you see any packets blocked in the tcpdump -eni pflog0 xterm?

Who is supposed to hand out the IP addresses to the wlan clients? The OBSD router? Does it have the DHCP daemon running?
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Last edited by J65nko; 2nd January 2010 at 05:10 PM. Reason: typo
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Old 2nd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
WARNING: en1: no IPv4 address assigned[/code]As you know without IP address it is difficult to communicate.
I know. The IP address is applied manually to the interface via config. The reason why I've got the error message was merely because I've started tcpdump before the interface was brought up.

[QUOTE=J65nko;29065]Do you see any packets blocked in the tcpdump -eni pflog0 xterm?

No.

The only thing that appears is the message that igmp is being passed (as seen on post n° 28: http://www.daemonforums.org/showpost...2&postcount=28). But strangely the corresponding rule seems to be associated with the internal interface gem0. I do not understand this message because there's no rule that does igmp nor is there a rule that logs such things.

Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
Who is supposed to hand out the IP addresses to the wlan clients? The OBSD router? Does it have the DHCP daemon running?
The IP address is being given to the clients not by DHCPD since I switched that one off for the moment. I give the IP addresses manually.
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Old 2nd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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A block log (all) logs all blocked packets to pflog0. That is why I insist on having that rule in your pf.conf

A tcpdump on your wlan rum0 interface will only show the packets that arrive on that interface. That does not mean that pf will let them pass.
The only proof that the packet will pass out on your external interface, is seeing it go out in the tcpdump -eni $EXT xterm.

If the packet is blocked by pf , we will, because of that "block log (all)" rule, see it in the tcpdump -eni pflog0 xterm.
If we don't see a packet meant to leave through the external interface, it either will have been blocked by pf, and be visible on pflog0, or the router doesn't know how to route it.

That is how we cover all possible routes (pun intended )

BTW If you give the IP addresses manually, you also have to give them them default route and tell them which name servers to use.
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Old 3rd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
BTW If you give the IP addresses manually, you also have to give them them default route and tell them which name servers to use.
Yes of course.

Ok. I've tested all what I can think of. The iphone mainly produces traffic to 17.149.36.139:5223 which is being blocked out on $EXT. (I guess it is routed correctly but blocked on the outgoing interface.) This seems to be some sort of Apple crap. However, requests to google.com (port 80) and dns requests (port 53) are being passed out. Request from the client to port 1900 and 5353 are only seen on $WLAN and seem to be passing in the firewall on $WLAN but since there's no daemon or whatsoever listening on those ports the router sends icmp port not reachable packets back. Manually blocking these igmp packets (of which I still don't know what they are good for) does not make any difference.

So in the end. I'm still puzzled.
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Old 3rd January 2010
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Oh... And by the way. I also enabled dhcpd with "option router" set without any change in bahaviour of the clients.
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Old 3rd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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You could check netstat -s | grep route for stats of non-routable packets
Code:
$netstat -s | grep route
        0 output packets discarded due to no route
        0 SYNs dropped (no route or no space)
        0 output packets discarded due to no route
                0 no route
        0 bad router solicitation messages
        0 bad router advertisement messages
Or browse the complete output with netstat -s | less or netstat -ss | less.

I also noticed that your iPhone could send several requests out and received the corresponding replies.

RE port 1900

Code:
$ grep 1900 /etc/services                   
ssdp            1900/tcp                        # SSDP
ssdp            1900/udp                        # SSDP
The Simple Service Discovery Protocol entry on wikipedia states
Quote:
Originally Posted by wikipedia
Simple Service Discovery Protocol (SSDP) is an expired IETF Internet draft by Microsoft and Hewlett-Packard. SSDP is the basis of the discovery protocol of Universal plug-and-play.

SSDP provides a mechanism which network clients can use to discover network services. Clients can use SSDP with little or no static configuration.

SSDP uses UDP unicast and multicast packets to advertise available services. The multicast address used is 239.255.255.250 in IPv4
[snip]
SSDP uses port 1900.
Also see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Universal_Plug_and_Play.

The Zeroconf entry mentions the 169.254.0.0/16 block which also could be seen in the tcpdump captures.

I hope the netstat -s output of the OBSD firewall gives us some clue what is wrong.
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Old 3rd January 2010
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Thanks for the lengthy reply. I'm not yet finished reading the articles but will continue soon.

In the meantime I played once again with the settings. The weird thing now is that the iphone disconnects every 10 seconds AGAIN. And I changed nothing overnight except for plugging off the adapter and enabled dhcpd for a short time.

Back to the original settings from yesterday, the iphone still disconnects every 10 seconds. Then I remembered that I did change one thing, but not on the router but on the iphone: I turned off notifications. Enabled notifications again, the iphone disconnects every 60 seconds...

Then I had a nice idea. I tried to ping the iphone from the router. What should I say. It works. But while the router is pinging the iphone it won't disconnect (tested it for 5 minutes). So I figured out as long as there is some kind of traffic or communication between the router and the iphone the iphone won't disconnect. Now that's strange. Maybe the adapter wants to change the frequency (or channel or what ever) every 10 seconds and the clients can't cope with that or are disoriented somehow?

netstat -s | grep route shows some discarded output packets due to no route but the value doesn't changed over the last hour, so I suspect the rule contains just an old counter.

Any other suggestions? Maybe it is possible to turn off channel hopping for the adapter or something similar?
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Old 3rd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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I know how to debug OBSD firewalls and DMZ setups, but I never have used wireless stuff, until a month ago when Sinterklaas or Saint Nicolas brought me 2x a Netgear WNHDE111 HD 5 Ghz access point/bridge.

At this moment one, as access point, is connected to a switch in the living room. The switch connect to my wife's computer and the OpenBSD firewall.

In my work room I have the other Netgear configured as a bridge. It connects to a switch with my two desktops connected.

The bridge and the access point use proxy ARP. That is the only way because both wlan AP and bridge are in the same 192.168.222.0/24 network.
That is another reason why I was interested to see your MAC addresses.

I am going to add a third NIC to my OBSD firewall next week so the wireless LAN will have it's own subnet.

What witheld me from wifi thus far is, that in my previous house nearly every room had UTP cable. I also disliked the low transmission speeds of the first wifi standards , and the unreliability and unsafety.
I just could not believe people wanted to use that, sorry for the word, crap.

Now I have to leave my door open, else the signal strength drops from 82 to 60%..
But the speed is OK, I get the same 750KB ftp downloads like over the wired Lan.

Wifi, sorry my faith in you is weak, I am not a strong believer yet

In my case the AP and the bridge negotiate the channel, so far no complaints about that.
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Old 3rd January 2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
The bridge and the access point use proxy ARP. That is the only way because both wlan AP and bridge are in the same 192.168.222.0/24 network.
That is another reason why I was interested to see your MAC addresses.
My setup is as follows:

Code:
        notebook
         /
home-ethernet -----
                   \_____ router -----> cable modem ---- vpn ----> employee
    home-wifi -----´          
           \
        iphone
I don't like wifi either. But since I'm taking the iphone with me all the time and the only possibility to access the internet is wifi you depend more or less on it if you don't want to pay extra for umts or such alike. Speed is not an issue for me by the way.

So what options do I have now?

1. Try setting up an arp proxy? Does that help?
2. Retry everything again and publishing the mac addresses here?
3. Maybe this issue is related to hardware and not software (routing, firewall, etc.) ?
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Old 3rd January 2010
J65nko J65nko is offline
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I find it strange that the iPhone is able to connect and communicate through the firewall.
Don't you have another i386 desktop install a WiFi card and OpenBSD on it and try that as wireless client ?

To eliminate the rum0 hardware, you could go to a Mom and Pop shop in the neighbourhood and get a hardware AP like I have, on a NoCureNoPay basis
For less then 100 bucks, why continue struggling?

You first plug it on your home ethernet. If that works then can add another NIC to your router. connect the hardware AP into the new NIC, so can give the wifi a subnet of its own, separate from the wired Lan.
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Old 3rd January 2010
mayuka mayuka is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
I find it strange that the iPhone is able to connect and communicate through the firewall.
Don't you have another i386 desktop install a WiFi card and OpenBSD on it and try that as wireless client ?
I only could try my Apple notebook which has Windos under vmware. I think I'll try that one out first.

The iphone never was able to get packages other than port 80 and 53 through the firewall. The other packets (mainly port 5223) were blocked at the outside interface (EXT), port 5353 and port 1900 first blocked then passed on the wifi interface.
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Old 3rd February 2010
nerfur nerfur is offline
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I have D-Link DWA-110 (based on rum0).
I use it as client adapter on my laptop (because on-board wifi is unsupported Atheros 5424) and i can add my little experience. Your problems is probably drivers-related, my rum0 too semi-randomly disconnects from AP. But not in "ifconfig" form (status is active and link is established) but in "dhcp" form (because i need to "sudo dhclient rum0" to fix it).

I use ifstated to automagically check (ping google.com) and fix my connection.

PS So, IMHO, buggy driver/hardware version.

PPS And sorry for my "newbie" terms, i'm total zero in networking.
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Old 3rd February 2010
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Do you have your adapter running in ap mode or just in "normal" mode?
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Old 3rd February 2010
nerfur nerfur is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mayuka View Post
Do you have your adapter running in ap mode or just in "normal" mode?
as i said before i run it "normal" client mode, but behavior is very similar, isn't it?
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