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FreeBSD Ports and Packages Installation and upgrading of ports and packages on FreeBSD.

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Old 11th April 2010
Broodjegehaktmetmayo Broodjegehaktmetmayo is offline
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Default [Noob] test a port before install?

I thought by adding [Noob] you could easily see it's me again

Last week, I read somewhere a comment from somebody with a solution to a problem we all know: you do an install of a large port, you decide to put out your monitor and let it cook for the night, only to find out the next morning that it halted 5 minutes after you put out your monitor. He had a command to 'pretest' the port first. From what I recall it wasn't one of the 'make' steps, it was a separate kind of command.

I checked:
- FreeBSD handbook
- Two FreeBSD books I have
- port utilities in the ports
- Google

But I can't seem to find it anymore. Such a utility however would be extremely handy, as I intend to build koffice-kde4 from ports (as there doesn't seem to be a package).

Would anybody happen to know of such a utility? I promiss I will write it down in my notes

Thanks in advance
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Old 11th April 2010
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This is the default behaviour of portmaster ... It runs through all the config options (recursively) before starting the actual build process. So run portmaster editors/koffice-kde4 and you should be set. There may be a similar flag for portupgrade. I forget. This is not to be confused with any --batch or BATCH= option.

Last edited by DutchDaemon; 11th April 2010 at 09:44 PM.
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Old 11th April 2010
Broodjegehaktmetmayo Broodjegehaktmetmayo is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DutchDaemon View Post
This is the default behaviour of portmaster ... It runs through all the config options (recursively) before starting the actual build process. So run portmaster editors/koffice-kde4 and you should be set. There may be a similar flag for portupgrade. I froget. This is not to be confused with any --batch or BATCH= option.
Thanks thanks thanks
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Old 11th April 2010
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Except for what you must actually compile and run the program for, many things can be found out by inspecting the files. For example the Makefile will tell you configuration data available (think make config and old knobs), pkg-plist and or Makefile the things contents (names of programs, manuals, paths, etc), and so on.


If you look at the dependencies declared in the Makefile you'll have an idea of what needs to be installed; special make targets can even give a more detailed list. Take a look at the ports manual page and the big kahunua in Mk for details.


How long crap actually takes to compile on your hardware, you kind of get a feel for after a while. For example, I know Firefox takes a good 2 1/2-3 hours to build on my laptop. Plus any dependencies.
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Old 12th April 2010
Broodjegehaktmetmayo Broodjegehaktmetmayo is offline
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Originally Posted by TerryP View Post
Except for what you must actually compile and run the program for, many things can be found out by inspecting the files. For example the Makefile will tell you configuration data available (think make config and old knobs), pkg-plist and or Makefile the things contents (names of programs, manuals, paths, etc), and so on.


If you look at the dependencies declared in the Makefile you'll have an idea of what needs to be installed; special make targets can even give a more detailed list. Take a look at the ports manual page and the big kahunua in Mk for details.


How long crap actually takes to compile on your hardware, you kind of get a feel for after a while. For example, I know Firefox takes a good 2 1/2-3 hours to build on my laptop. Plus any dependencies.
I like how you all just push me into deep waters, but as a complete noob for me it is quite an accomplishment having been able to install FreeBSD, KDE, sound, printer, flash, and so on and so forth, and even doing that without ruining my XP (dual boot). In order for me to understand the Makefile and all that is related will require more knowledge than I currently have as a noob. it takes time, but my goal is to ultimately be able to give you all answers to questions you all can't solve. We'll get there (in about 10 years ).

Thanks again
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Old 12th April 2010
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Actually the parts of interest in the makefiles, are fairly easy to read even if you don't know how to write them, the harder parts (rule bodies) are something you rarely need to be read, unless you want to ask ports a very specific question, like how does `make deinstall` actually de install a port, or if you want to create a port for some application.



It (starting off with FreeBSD) can be a whole lot to take in, don't worry, just take it in bit and byte sized chunks .

Unix is kind of like programming and many good parts of computer stuffs: things are well layered upon other layers like a good lasagna. So most things can be learned from higher and easier stages and at your own pace for the most part. +/- blowing anything up with an Rocket Propelled Grenade lol
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Old 13th April 2010
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Using portmaster is the easiest way, as it handles a lot of the heavy lifting behind the scenes (checking dependencies, installing/upgrading deps as needed, tracking the install, etc).

However, if you want to do it manually, via the ports tree, then the command you are looking for is config-recursive. This will show the OPTIONS screen for the port, and all of it's dependencies, one after the other. Once that is done, you can do make or make install and let it run overnight.

For all the different make commands that can be used, read through the ports(7) man page.
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