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Old 14th November 2011
J65nko J65nko is offline
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Default PHP 5.4 approaches with first release candidate

From http://h-online.com/-1378615

Quote:
The PHP development team has announced the arrival of the first release candidate (RC1) of version 5.4 of its PHP scripting language. The next major release of PHP introduces new language features, such as traits for better code reuse, an integrated web server and a short syntax for arrays. Changes since the second beta include the addition of the ability to access a class member when creating the class and making a conversion from an array to a string produce a notice.
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Old 14th November 2011
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Quote:
Changed silent conversion of array to string to produce a notice.
Finally!

Printing "Array" is not useful at all and is *never* what you want. Instead, do what every other programming language does: Just print contents (i.e. what print_r() does), so we're not quite there yet. In any case, a warning is a lot better.

We also *finally* get the "short" array syntax, which is also what pretty much every other language does. This feature only took about 4 years to implement in PHP (literally, this has been in the works for ages).
You can now use:
$arr = ['key' => 'value'];
instead of:
$arr = array('key' => 'value');

Both "indexed arrays" and "associative arrays" use the same syntax, which is a bit of a shame IMHO. They're really separate data structures with different properties, at least, they are in most languages, maybe there is no difference in PHP's implementation (I would not be surprised...)?

Ofcourse, you still have to use array_*() function which makes the saving minimal, not only are they pretty long to type, they're not always easy to work with since you never know which order the specify the arguments. For example, it's array_map($callback, $array) and array_walk_recursive ($array, $callback) just to name one example. It's just really really silly.

One more piece of good(-ish) news is that you can now use:
$var = fun()['2'];

This is probably something of a quick syntax hack, and certainly not the same "everything's an object" model Python or Ruby sport, but it saves a line of typing.

I wonder if it allows:
$vars = fun()['2']['4'];
or
$vars = fun2(fun()['2'])['3'];

One new feature that's also interesting is proper upload tracking through sessions, you can access $_SESSION['upload_progress'] and get the upload start time, file size, filename, etc. Very useful for creating progress bars and the like: Something that was previously semi-impossible, all the existing "solutions" only worked with Apache/mod_php and/or were not reliable in large numbers.
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Old 14th November 2011
J65nko J65nko is offline
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I still wonder why PHP still cannot tag data retrieved from the net,as tainted, like in Perl. See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taint_checking
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Old 15th November 2011
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Right, that sounds pretty useful.

At least in Python and Javascript, and I suspect in Ruby and Perl, this would actually be fairly easy to implement, for example in Python you can use:

Code:
>>> class Myint(int):
...   myprop = 0
... 
>>> var = MyInt(42)
>>> var
42
>>> var.myprop
0
>>> var.myprop = 1
>>> var
42
>>> var.myprop
1
>>>
You just subclass the int type (it's just an object) and add a new property: You can then use this property to flag if the variable has been escaped, you would only need a "custom" escape() and query() function which sets/checks it. Actually, it may be best to just add an escape() method.

Anyhow, I once looked at implementing something like this in PHP. At my previous employer I had built a webshop, originally, all the prices should be displayed with VAT, but then later (naturally, after the whole thing was finished & was live ) there was a request for users to toggle prices display with or without VAT.
My original idea was similar to the above: Create a new int type, add a flag "VAT", and use that to calculate the correct price on invoices and so forth, this would provide the maximal flexibility and the least coding.
As far as I could find, there is no real way to do this in PHP

There are workarounds: you can extend the ArrayObject or StdObject, and using that you can *simulate* "custom types" and flag if the variable was escaped, but IMHO it's a lot less cleaner than the above example in Python ...

But with sufficient planning and design, you could use it to implement taint checking ... Perhaps some of the frameworks like Doctrine already do something like this (Or use a different approach?).
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Old 15th November 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carpetsmoker View Post
One more piece of good(-ish) news is that you can now use:
$var = fun()['2'];

This is probably something of a quick syntax hack, and certainly not the same "everything's an object" model Python or Ruby sport, but it saves a line of typing.

I wonder if it allows:
$vars = fun()['2']['4'];
or
$vars = fun2(fun()['2'])['3'];
Similar syntatic sugar has been in Perl since dirt was formed. In fact, I have been asked variants of this question in job interviews just to gauge much experience I had with the language. For example, if constructing today's date is the desired purpose:
Code:
#!/bin/env perl
my ($sec, $min, $hour, $mday, $mon, $year, $wday, $yday, $isdst) = localtime(time);
printf "%d-$mon-$mday\n", $year + 1900;
...can be reduced to the following which eliminates a lot of extraneous clutter:
Code:
#!/bin/env perl
my ($year, $mon, $mday) = (localtime time)[5,4,3];
printf "%d-$mon-$mday\n", $year + 1900;
FWIW.
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