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Old 5th February 2014
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My two operating systems are Slackware and OpenBSD. I love the security of OpenBSD; it is simple, elegant, and runs with minimal system resources.
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Old 7th February 2014
Ninguem Ninguem is offline
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Free/Open/Net in that order. Still haven't used Dragonfly as a system
Hmmm. Will it ever be possible that the BSD groups would get together to exchange code and ideas? This would help development of all four.

On-OffTopic. FreeBSD. I have more experience porting and testing on this platform.
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Old 7th February 2014
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Will it ever be possible that the BSD groups would get together to exchange code and ideas? This would help development of all four.
The various projects monitor check-in's to each other's source repositories all the time. Simply watch their check-in messages; you will see credit given to other projects on a frequent basis.
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Old 7th February 2014
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Well my first 'real' OS was a NetBSD 1.5; that I installed on my 486/40Mhz with 4 MB of memory. Linux Red Hat that I tried to run, was requesting to much disk space [250 MB - that was my beloved hdd] so I was forced to seek replacement for it. After some time I finally found it in NetBSD project.
For the first two-three years I doesn't use any X window manager instead normal console work was done by me, programming in shell/C, do irc botnet mange work, and some BSD research, and games
I ported the classic chess game from the Unix v.6 [these game also appears in various BSD distributions like 2.11/Reno/etc.] to my NetBSD box.
In fact If you go to /usr/games directory you will find many classic positions like:
wargames or quiz.

Today I still run NetBSD.
Great OS. With real solid documentation; for instance: http://www.netbsd.org/docs/kernel/
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Old 8th February 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by muflon View Post
Well my first 'real' OS was a NetBSD 1.5; that I installed on my 486/40Mhz with 4 MB of memory. Linux Red Hat that I tried to run, was requesting to much disk space [250 MB - that was my beloved hdd] so I was forced to seek replacement for it. After some time I finally found it in NetBSD project.
For the first two-three years I doesn't use any X window manager instead normal console work was done by me, programming in shell/C, do irc botnet mange work, and some BSD research, and games
I ported the classic chess game from the Unix v.6 [these game also appears in various BSD distributions like 2.11/Reno/etc.] to my NetBSD box.
In fact If you go to /usr/games directory you will find many classic positions like:
wargames or quiz.

Today I still run NetBSD.
Great OS. With real solid documentation; for instance: http://www.netbsd.org/docs/kernel/
You are the kind of user that any of BSDs project could use more off. BSDs crave for users like you and do not need any of Linux is better than Windows crowd.
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Old 9th February 2014
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I'm not sure we "love" operating systems. However, we certainly enjoy them!

FreeBSD has a bigger slice of the developer pool, so its updates are more frequent, and I appreciate that aspect. NetBSD seems to be more attuned to alternative platforms, and I've enjoyed using NetBSD for other architectures. NetBSD was available for use with Xen way back when Xen was not working on FreeBSD. Day-to-day, I use FreeBSD more than NetBSD.
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Old 10th February 2014
muflon muflon is offline
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You are the kind of user that any of BSDs project could use more off. BSDs crave for users like you and do not need any of Linux is better than Windows crowd.
In Poland at that time when I've got these PC [in 2001], Internet connection was situated to 'kid user' at luxury level
So I spend lot of time in local Library reading many books and articles about the computer related stuff, especially I focused on Richard Stevens TCP/IP Protokoły tom 1, [Protocols vol. 1], translated and published in Poland in 1998 [the second edition was done by Helion in 2013], these book become one of the first real deal publications that I have read from the first to the last page, the next one with which I done the same was published in 1999 Programowanie w środowisku systemu UNIX, Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment, also written by Stevens.
It is really sad that Such a great Mind has passed away...

NetBSD was the OS that helped me understand the basic ideas that were stated in late 50'. of the XX century by the MIT professor Fernando José Corbató, whose Compatible Time Sharing System [CTSS] was the first ever that shears the ideas of modern interactive computing. There is even an proverb that says:
Before Corby: No Timesharing.
After Corby: Timesharing.

Naturally the C language was the main difference between Corby's Multics project and Thompson/Ritchie Unix idea, that was implemented to the OS internals, mainly to write the kernel using high level language.

By the way, Jolitz, William F. and Jolitz, Lynne Greer: Porting UNIX to the 386: A Practical Approach, 18-part series in Dr. Dobbs Journal, January 1991 - July 1992 - these is a great story, about how the basic system works, especially do to the xBSD family tree.

Salute To You!
Greetings,
Marcin

Last edited by muflon; 10th February 2014 at 10:14 PM.
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Old 13th February 2014
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Phew, I don't actually "love" BSD, I just love to use it.

I came to FreeBSD in 2010 when my Debian GNU/Linux server decided to break once more. The process of change was surprisingly easy, it "just worked", the Ports system made it easy to tailor a server environment for my specific needs, everything I need is available from the ports, and updates rarely broke anything. (The PHP port randomly does, but that's because my update cronjob sends me the UPDATING file too late. )

On the desktop, I find DragonFly BSD quite interesting (after having read through their docs), however, various versions' installation media failed to install without random hiccups. FreeBSD couldn't reach my WiFi on the specific device. So I'm with OpenBSD on it: Small download, small system, adequate RAM usage, highly flexible and moderately easy to set up. It just works.

I guess "it just works" pretty much sums "the BSDs" up...

(At work I have to use a MacBook. Is this considered a BSD? Well, I don't like it.)
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Old 14th February 2014
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(At work I have to use a MacBook. Is this considered a BSD? Well, I don't like it.)
Technically, yes, it is a BSD. I use it at work as well. It's actually very stable, although can be slow. It's got a bash console, so it ain't so bad.
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Old 14th February 2014
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My first experience with the MacBook was that Emacs reproducably crashed... so much about the stability.

(bash? That thing still exists?)
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Old 14th February 2014
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Emacs + GUI is just wrong. Sure, but did the system crash? Bash... I know, right?
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Old 14th February 2014
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No, the system "worked" (except for the sick key bindings). It was just Emacs which crashed. The first time ever.
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Old 14th February 2014
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Technically, yes, it is a BSD. I use it at work as well. It's actually very stable, although can be slow. It's got a bash console, so it ain't so bad.
No it is not! It uses Mach kernel and the only connection to BSDs came through Jordan Hubbard one of original FreeBSD core team members who basically ported BSD userland on the top Mach kernel. Aqua was independently developed as you know. Jordan left Apple last year to work for IX Systems (FreeNAS, TrueOS, PC-BSD). Even before his departure OS X userland was less and less FreeBSD. In part due to the fact that FreeBSD userland size development many years ago and in part due to numerous Linux-ism. However one bright development from BSD point of view was Apple switching from IPFW to PF about year and a half ago. DTrace is cool. Unfortunately lack of centralized scripts and default plist configuration format will annoy the bones out of any hard core BSD user.

All in all OS X can feel pretty Unix-u in the hands of skilfully person which is not really core customer base (with exception of FreeBSD developers ) of Apple corporation.
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Old 14th February 2014
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Ah, thanks, good info! I had heard that Jordan left for iX Systems, and the move to PF.

It works pretty well, and pays the bills for me. I work in the print industry, so Macs are defacto here. It's funny to use the console, and have other Mac users look on in wonder, and ask "What are you doing, there?" Most have never used it, or know what to do with it.
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Old 15th February 2014
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It's funny to use the console, and have other Mac users look on in wonder, and ask "What are you doing, there?"
That's how I feel in the company I work for, having Emacs on one screen and SSH/zsh on the other, both in full-screen mode so I don't have to see that ugly interface...

I can't say how different the userland has become; ssh is still BSD ssh as far as I can see, and that's all.
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Old 15th February 2014
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Ah, thanks, good info! I had heard that Jordan left for iX Systems, and the move to PF.
It works pretty well, and pays the bills for me. I work in the print industry, so Macs are defacto here. It's funny to use the console, and have other Mac users look on in wonder, and ask "What are you doing, there?" Most have never used it, or know what to do with it.
Well that was Apple intention all along to shield an average (I should say wealthy) Joe from Unix. Nothing wrong with making honest living using MACs. In my line of business (Scientific Computing) off and on I get a grad student even a post doc trying to access my infrastructure with fancy Apple laptop. You should see their faces when I open terminal on their beloved MacBook Pros change bash with Korn shell and start writing sed and AWK scripts on the fly to do various things on the remote computing nodes

Last edited by Oko; 15th February 2014 at 01:49 AM.
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Old 15th February 2014
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That's how I feel in the company I work for, having Emacs on one screen and SSH/zsh on the other, both in full-screen mode so I don't have to see that ugly interface...

I can't say how different the userland has become; ssh is still BSD ssh as far as I can see, and that's all.
I always admired zsh users. I am just too old to switch from korn. Try sed, AWK, grep, tar, find and similar on your MACK. You will note that awk is not nawk but rather gawd, tar is GNU tar and similar things. That is what I mean by user-land. It is fairly straightforward to clean OS X from Linux-isms and have BSD tools.

Last edited by Oko; 15th February 2014 at 01:53 AM.
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Old 15th February 2014
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I remember having read that FreeBSD's sed supports some of GNU's options now "for Linux compatibility" or something.

Well, the zsh is quite easy, just fire up your usual options (colored ls, extended globbing, completion/history setup) and that's it, basically. I admit that scripting the zsh is complicated at times, at least compared to the syntax of the bash (and, to a lesser extent, the tcsh), though.

The ksh is pretty new to me. I've read that it features most options of the zsh; I haven't had any time to look into it yet.

(But yes, OSX is linux-y. All that GUI!)
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Old 23rd February 2014
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Default Why I love my LSD of choice.

I like FreeLSD because it lets me see melting walls and trailing fingers.
Wait, ....


Wrong forum.
Heh heh.
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Old 12th March 2014
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No it is not! It uses Mach kernel and the only connection to BSDs came through Jordan Hubbard one of original FreeBSD core team members who basically ported BSD userland on the top Mach kernel...
Thanks for the clarification. I had a misconception of this based on what I had heard about it's being based on a "hybrid BSD/Mach" kernel, but you're saying the "hybrid" really comes out of the idea of a Mach kernel + a BSD user-land.
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