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Old 12th June 2008
aleunix aleunix is offline
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Default Which is the best solution from start bsd.mp?

Which is the best solution from start bsd.mp?
Is there a configuration file to modify (if it's possible)?
Or the preferentially leave only bsd.mp on the root?
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Old 12th June 2008
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleunix View Post
Is there a configuration file to modify (if it's possible)?
Study Section 14.6 of the FAQ:

http://openbsd.org/faq/faq14.html#Boot386

..& the manpage for boot.conf(8).
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Old 12th June 2008
aleunix aleunix is offline
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Thanks.

The solutions is:
/etc/boot.conf
bsd.mp
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Old 12th June 2008
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleunix View Post
The solutions is:
/etc/boot.conf
bsd.mp
Not quite. The contents of /etc/boot.conf should be:
Code:
set image /bsd.mp
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Old 12th June 2008
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It's not clear for me.
When i setting the file as before I obtain the desired result which is the real difference between the two notations?
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Old 12th June 2008
cursedcompiler cursedcompiler is offline
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the openbsd bootloader, which reads /etc/boot.conf, actually allows different ways to point to a certain kernel; for example, you could also have "boot wd0a:/bsd.mp", which will do the same thing (if you boot from wd0a)...
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Old 12th June 2008
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aleunix View Post
...which is the real difference between the two notations?
Mine's cooler...

Seriously, as I look back at the manpage, I can see that your abbreviated form may work, but most documentation standardizes on "set image <pathname>".

If you are really curious, you always have the source to answer the question yourself.
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Old 15th June 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ocicat View Post
Not quite. The contents of /etc/boot.conf should be:
Code:
set image /bsd.mp
Excellent thread. I was wondering if you could clarify further the role of
the file /etc/boot.conf. According to man pages I could put in boot.conf essentially anything that I could put on

Code:
boot> -c
ukc>

So lat say I have the following situation. I am using bsd.mp
kernel and I want to get a read of the driver uscanner
since my scanner needs to be attached as ugen device
in order to work. How can I do that by editing /etc/boot.conf file. My guess that it should be as easy as

either

Code:
set image /bsd.mp
disable uscanner

or

Code:
disable uscanner
set image /bsd.mp
Which one is correct if any?

Cheers,
OKO
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Old 15th June 2008
J65nko J65nko is offline
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Oko, did you try?

IMHO none of these are correct. The keyword disable is not listed in boot(8)

You can modify the OpenBSD kernel with the config(8) command, either temporarily or permanently. This man page as well as http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq5.html#config have an example.
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Old 15th June 2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by J65nko View Post
Oko, did you try?

IMHO none of these are correct. The keyword disable is not listed in boot(8)

You can modify the OpenBSD kernel with the config(8) command, either temporarily or permanently. This man page as well as http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq5.html#config have an example.
No Janko, I didn't try. I usually configure kernel during the boot with as

Code:
boot> -c
ukc> disable uscanner
ukc>quit
but while I was reading the thread about bsd.mp kernel and man pages
for boot.conf it occurred to me that above might be possible. This is the
quote from the man pages for boot.conf

5. If the file /etc/boot.conf exists on the filesystem boot was loaded
from, open and parse it. This file may contain any commands boot
accepts at the interactive prompt. Though default settings usually
suffice, they can be changed here.

boot.conf processing can be skipped by holding down either Control
key as boot starts.

I have not read things carefully nor I played with it so I am probably wrong.
By the way the man pages are from 4.3 current i386 with GENERIC bsd.mp kernel.

Thank for the quick response.
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Old 15th June 2008
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Well, it's not my field.. but

disable dev -> is in the config and boot_config manuals, difference being config for running kernels, BOOT_CONFIG for boot prompts or launched through config.


So I would reckon you could use boot.conf to do it, if it boot_config can be accessed or scripted through it.


Like all good curiosities, the best way of finding out what works and what doesn't work boils down to read the code or back it up and play with it.


general disclaimer:

I know the least about OpenBSDs intricate boot details of any system I use -- simply put, it's always worked for me out of the box ^_^.
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Old 15th June 2008
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If you have used boot -c, and made changes from the UKC console which you wish to make permanent, config -u will pick up those changes.

If I wished to maintain multiple kernel configurations, as Oko is suggesting, then I would have multiple kernels, each configured differently, and select the appropriate kernel at the boot> prompt.
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Old 19th June 2008
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The craftsman's way:

mv /bsd /bsd.orig && cp /bsd.mp /bsd && reboot
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Old 19th June 2008
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sternchenschaf, did you miss this?

http://marc.info/?l=openbsd-misc&m=121361034607921&w=2
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Old 23rd June 2008
sternchenschaf sternchenschaf is offline
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I do not reading misc@... I never accidentally copied something into /bsd. That means I'm a lucky fart or I'm a good craftsman, or I use sparc64.

Code:
# uname -m
sparc64
# man boot.conf
man: no entry for boot.conf in the manual.
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Old 23rd June 2008
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The sparc64 architecture has an equivalent capability:
Quote:
The UltraSPARC Open Firmware will normally look for a bootloader on the
device specified by the boot-device variable. The OpenBSD bootloader
will then look for a kernel named bsd by default, unless the boot-file
variable is set, or a different filename has been specified in the boot
command. To reset this variable to its default, empty, value, type the
following:

ok set-default boot-file
Ref: boot_sparc64(8).
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Old 23rd June 2008
sternchenschaf sternchenschaf is offline
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Nope, it's not equivalent! Try that remote... :}
The craftsman's way works 'with OpenBSD'... and in case of doing no mistake, it's an very usefull way... for me since years... And finally, if needed you can boot 'bsd.orig' to get your system running with the original GERNERIC kernel.

Last edited by sternchenschaf; 23rd June 2008 at 05:14 PM.
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Old 4th May 2009
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[I'm resurrecting this old thread to discuss "set image" in boot.conf, mentioned above.

As of -current installlation scripting, and therefore for 4.6 this fall, "set image" is no longer considered best practice.

The install script sets the appropriate kernel as "/bsd".
"set image" is only available for i386/amd64 and not for other architectures.
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Old 4th May 2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jggimi View Post
[I'm resurrecting this old thread to discuss "set image" in boot.conf, mentioned above.

As of -current installlation scripting, and therefore for 4.6 this fall, "set image" is no longer considered best practice.

The install script sets the appropriate kernel as "/bsd".
"set image" is only available for i386/amd64 and not for other architectures.
Just to add to Jggimi's comment. This is the thread to read

http://archive.openbsd.nu/?ml=openbs...-05&m=10592603

Particularly pay attention to Theo's posts.
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