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Old 9th September 2018
Funkygoby Funkygoby is offline
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Default Listen to FM radio on your computer?

Hello,
I was wondering if any of you had managed to listen to FM radios with your BSD of choice (or even linux) workstation. It is my understanding that an external FM receiver is required in most of the case and that proprietary driver hell might be involved.
My machine is a thinkpad X200s and I am in Europe if that matters?

Any thoughts?
Thanks.
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Old 9th September 2018
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IdOp IdOp is offline
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Do you mean you want to control an FM receiver via computer software, rather than streaming or analog audio input to the sound card?
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Old 9th September 2018
shep shep is offline
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In the U.S. most of our Public Broadcasting Stations transmit on a local FM radio band and also provide streaming content.

For example WNCW broadcasts on 101.3fm in Charlotte, NC and also provides an 128mps mp3 stream.
http://www.wncw.org/

If the station you are interested in does not provide a intrenet stream, there are Tuner cards.
https://www.newegg.com/Product/Produ...82E16815116606

I would check bktr(4), fms(4) and radio(4) for supported chipsets.

Last edited by shep; 10th September 2018 at 07:04 PM.
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Old 10th September 2018
Funkygoby Funkygoby is offline
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@IdOp, @shep: Thank you.
I have no internet connexion at home, by choice. So the streaming option is out.
I have no hardware, no tuner that I could listen to or plug into the input of the laptop for recording.

I do have a sansa clip+. It's a fine little mp3 player that also have FM radio capabilities. It uses the earphones cable as an antenna.
Basically, I am trying to replicate this functionality on my laptop. I was wondering what specific hardware does this little sansa clip+ has that is missing from my laptop. Maybe I was hoping someone would say "yeah, the wifi chip also has FM tuner capabilities, just use this driver-mode and this software"

It seems the most direct option is to get one of those FM Tuner - USB dongle.
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Old 10th September 2018
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Thanks for the additional info. One idea is:

If your computer has a line-in audio jack, you might be able to connect the headphone output of the sansa to it using an analog audio cable. Start with the volume on minimum and make sure it doesn't go too high.

Cell phones may also have FM tuner capability, doesn't even have to be a smartphone, some old flip-phone may do, and you could try the same sort of thing with that.

Maybe there are better ideas too.
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