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Old 17th February 2018
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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Glad you got it resolved.
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Old 1st June 2018
afdruiprek afdruiprek is offline
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Hello.

I run -current on my laptop (x220) and it works great.
use to update it with the latest snapshot every week
i download all the necessary files from an ftp mirror to
my /mnt/home/afdruiprek/upgrade folder
and cp bsd.rd to / and reboot bsd.rd and update, all has worked well untill now.

when it was time to install today it verifyed all files and installed bsd bsd.rd and bsd.mp
but when it was time for base63.tgz it says "id0 on /mnt: file system is full", which is true.

df -h shows (I use full disk encryption therefore sd1)
Filesystem size used avail capacity Mounted on
/dev/sd1a 1005M 1003m -48.4M 105% /mnt

when i installed the system from the start i choose auto partitioning.


When i boot the system normal i cant do anything, some things was probably owerwritten.

init : can´t exec /bin/sh for /etc/rc: Exec format error

When i try to change shell nothing hapens.

How can i make /mnt bigger (without damage everything else)? or what files under /mnt is it safe to remove to make room for the update.
du dosent work.

Best regards...
~
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Old 1st June 2018
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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In a default installation, "/mnt" is an empty directory in the root filesystem "/". Its purpose is to be a mount point for removable media or other temporarily accessed filesystems, as described in the hier(8) man page.

In your environment, you appear to have used this directory for other purposes, since you have a "/mnt/home/..." whereas the default filesystem for user directories is "/home".

The root filesystem is designed to hold the second-stage bootloader (/boot), kernels (/bsd* files), configuration files (/etc), device nodes (/dev), a mount point used for root filesystem backup (/altroot), static binary programs (/bin, /sbin), and mount points to all the other filesystems. The automatic allocation, if used, varies depending on architecture and the size of the physical drive. On large drives, the size of the root filesystem will typically be limited to 1GB, as it is in your configuration. See the AUTOMATIC DISK ALLOCATION section in disklabel(8) for details.

Without seeing your complete df(1) output, I will be unable to provide you with any recommendations.

Last edited by jggimi; 1st June 2018 at 08:45 PM. Reason: clarity - and a bunch of typos
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Old 1st June 2018
afdruiprek afdruiprek is offline
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The reason why i didn't post the whole df is because i could not copy it from the laptop
and /mnt/home is because df was run from bsd.rd boot, normal boot docent work anymore

But here comes a hand written df -h
Code:
Filesystem  size     used      avail    capacity   Mounted on
/dev/rd0a    3.5M    3.2M     229k   94%      /
/dev/sd1a  1005M 1003m -48.4M  105%     /mnt
/dev/sd1k   95.0G  9.7G    80.5G    11%      /mnt/home
/dev/sd1d   3.9G    10.0k    3.7G       0%     /mnt/tmp
/dev/sd1f    2.0G    966M     946M     51%   /mnt/usr
/dev/sd1g  1005M   185M    769M     19%   /mnt/usr/X11R6
/dev/sd1h  9.8G      1.3G     8.1G      14%   /mnt/usr/local
/dev/sd1j   5.9G      2.0k      5.6G       0%   /mnt/usr/obj
/dev/sd1i   2.0G      2.0k       1.9G      0%   /mnt/usr/src
/dev/sd1e  18.1G     17.5M    17.2G    0%   /mnt/var

Last edited by ocicat; 2nd June 2018 at 03:35 AM. Reason: Please use [code] & [/code] tags when posting command output.
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Old 1st June 2018
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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Thank you for sharing this. Now I understand the "/mnt" references in your first post. You were using the RAMDISK kernel after running the upgrade script.

You need to determine what file has filled the root filesystem.

The most common reason is a standard file in the /dev directory instead of a character or block special file (device node).

/dev should be very small.
Code:
$ du -sh /dev
 34.0K   /dev
The only standard file in that directory should be the MAKEDEV(8) script. The other files should all either be character or block special files, or symbolic links. You can inspect and repair this even from that RAMDISK kernel's shell:

# cd /mnt/dev
# export TERM=vt220
# ls -l | less
# rm file.I.accidentally.created.with.a.typo

In most cases, the offending file will be obvious.

Should the /dev directory be correct and small, then the other directories on the root filesystem may be investigated.

Last edited by jggimi; 1st June 2018 at 10:16 PM. Reason: formatting, clarity
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Old 2nd June 2018
afdruiprek afdruiprek is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jggimi View Post
Thank you for sharing this. Now I understand the "/mnt" references in your first post. You were using the RAMDISK kernel after running the upgrade script.

You need to determine what file has filled the root filesystem.

The most common reason is a standard file in the /dev directory instead of a character or block special file (device node).

/dev should be very small.
Code:
$ du -sh /dev
 34.0K   /dev
The only standard file in that directory should be the MAKEDEV(8) script. The other files should all either be character or block special files, or symbolic links. You can inspect and repair this even from that RAMDISK kernel's shell:

# cd /mnt/dev
# export TERM=vt220
# ls -l | less
# rm file.I.accidentally.created.with.a.typo

In most cases, the offending file will be obvious.

Should the /dev directory be correct and small, then the other directories on the root filesystem may be investigated.
Thank you so much jggimi.

I was making a bootable usb with dd earlier this week and guess what ?
an 918M file in /mnt/dev called sd2

Everything works fine now.

Last edited by afdruiprek; 2nd June 2018 at 10:43 AM.
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