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Old 17th October 2021
gordon.f gordon.f is offline
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Default Partioning after install & other problems

Dear Members,

Good day! This is my first thread and I have to tell that I'm a complete noob for BSD scene, and yet, I just installed OpenBSD. I will definetely not quit using OpenBSD. I'm done with all the bloatware so your helps will be really appreciated.

-The main problem is that OpenBSD installed to a small portion of the hard disk. I cannot reach to the majority of the hard disk. Is there a way to partition the hard disk after installation? Or do I have to re-install everything?

-The other problem I detected is that when you pull the ethernet cable, OS just freezes and you cannot do anything.

Best Regards
Gordon
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Old 17th October 2021
gordon.f gordon.f is offline
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Please also view my disk information below.

Code:
hw.disknames=wd0:45eeca4e4bd485b9,cd0:,sd0:,sd1:,sd2:,sd3:
# /dev/rwd0c:
type: ESDI
disk: ESDI/IDE disk
label: Hitachi HDT72502
duid: 45eeca4e4bd485b9
flags:
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 19
tracks/cylinder: 224
sectors/cylinder: 4256
cylinders: 114754
total sectors: 488397168
boundstart: 32
boundend: 488393024
drivedata: 0 

16 partitions:
#                size           offset  fstype [fsize bsize   cpg]
  a:          2097152               32  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /
  b:          2603640          2097184    swap                    # none
  c:        488397168                0  unused                    
  d:          8388576          4700832  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /tmp
  e:         12547296         13089408  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var
  f:         12582912         25636704  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr
  g:          2097152         38219616  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/X11R6
  h:         41943040         40316768  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/local
  i:          4194304         82259808  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/src
  j:         12582912         86454112  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/obj
  k:        389355968         99037056  4.2BSD   4096 32768 26062 # /home
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Old 17th October 2021
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fvgit fvgit is offline
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Hello & welcome,

Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon.f View Post
-The main problem is that OpenBSD installed to a small portion of the hard disk. I cannot reach to the majority of the hard disk. Is there a way to partition the hard disk after installation? Or do I have to re-install everything?

What exactly do you mean by not being able to reach the majority of the hard disk? The disklabel you posted in your follow-up post looks normal to me. Here's how the disklabel looks on my own laptop:
Code:
# /dev/rwd0c:
type: ESDI
disk: ESDI/IDE disk
label: SanDisk SSD PLUS
duid: e6e647a2c5f01cc9
flags:
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 63
tracks/cylinder: 255
sectors/cylinder: 16065
cylinders: 29185
total sectors: 468862128
boundstart: 64
boundend: 468857025
drivedata: 0 

16 partitions:
#                size           offset  fstype [fsize bsize   cpg]
  a:          2097152               64  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /
  b:          8388608          2097216    swap                    # none
  c:        468862128                0  unused                    
  d:          8388608         10485824  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /tmp
  e:          8388608         18874432  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var
  f:          4194304         27263040  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var/log
  g:         16777216         31457344  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var/www
  h:          4194304         48234560  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr
  i:          2097152         52428864  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/X11R6
  j:         31457280         54526016  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/local
  k:          4194304         85983296  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/src
  l:         12582912         90177600  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/obj
  m:         41943040        102760512  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/ports
  n:        324153472        144703552  4.2BSD   4096 32768 26062 # /home
Unless you're referring to this:
Code:
  c:        488397168                0  unused
That's a special partition which describes the entire physical disk. In other words your partitions a, b, and d-k all reside inside c. See disklabel(8) 2nd paragraph.
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Old 17th October 2021
J65nko J65nko is offline
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Using -h you can select a more 'human readable' output format:
Code:
$ disklabel -h sd0

# /dev/rsd0c:
type: SCSI
disk: SCSI disk
label: MB1000GCWCV     
duid: 0353ff6115eea594
flags:
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 63
tracks/cylinder: 255
sectors/cylinder: 16065
cylinders: 121601
total sectors: 1953525168 # total bytes: 931.5G
boundstart: 64
boundend: 838860864
drivedata: 0 

16 partitions:
#                size           offset  fstype [fsize bsize   cpg]
  a:             1.0G               64  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /
  b:             4.2G          2097216    swap                    # none
  c:           931.5G                0  unused                    
  d:             4.0G         10907488  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /tmp
  e:            11.9G         19296064  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var
  f:             6.0G         44256608  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr
  g:             1.0G         56839520  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/X11R6
  h:            20.0G         58936672  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/local
  i:             4.0G       1258291264 unknown                    
  j:           327.5G       1266679872  ext2fs                    
  k:             2.0G        100879712  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/src
  l:             6.0G        105074016  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /usr/obj
  m:           300.0G        117656960  4.2BSD   4096 32768     1 # /home
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Old 18th October 2021
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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Hello and welcome, Gordon!


In this particular instance, the disk you have provisioned has 233 "engineering" GB of storage, or 250 "marketing" GB of storage. The disk has 488,397,168 addressable sectors of 512 bytes each, which is 250,059,350,016 bytes.

This disk storage has been completely allocated across 10 partitions. The largest single partition is /home, which has 186 GB of space allocated. The second largest partition is /usr/local, with 20 GB allocated. /var, /usr, and /usr/obj have been allocated 6 GB each, /tmp was allocated 4 GB, /usr/src allocated 2 GB, swap space (partition "b") has 1.2 GB allocated, and both /usr/X11R6 and the root partition / have been allocated 1 GB.
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Old 18th October 2021
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon.f View Post
...The other problem I detected is that when you pull the ethernet cable, OS just freezes and you cannot do anything.
This isn't a complete problem report, so my answer is just a wild guess: because disconnecting a network merely changes the state of the NIC (from active to inactive), you are running something that is dependent on the network, and when the network stops communicating, that something stops working. For example, you may be running some sort of integrated desktop environment such as Gnome or XFCE, which install hundreds of applications, including some which are dependent on a functioning network connection. Or you might be trying to switch between wired and wireless Ethernet automatically, and have somehow incorrectly provisioned your trunk(4).

More information about what you are doing, and why, and more information about the system -- for example, from dmesg(8) -- might help someone provide further help.
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Old 18th October 2021
gordon.f gordon.f is offline
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Dear fvgit, J65nko, and jggimi;

Thank you very much for welcoming and your replies. Please view the code below. As you can see I can use only 1GBs of area right now. Also I'm experiencing sudden crashes even tough I do not pull any cable from the computer.

Code:
<pre># /dev/rwd0c:
type: ESDI
disk: ESDI/IDE disk
label: Hitachi HDT72502
duid: 45eeca4e4bd485b9
flags:
bytes/sector: 512
sectors/track: 19
tracks/cylinder: 224
sectors/cylinder: 4256
cylinders: 114754
total sectors: 488397168 # total bytes: 232.9G
boundstart: 32
boundend: 488393024
drivedata: 0

16 partitions:
#                size           offset  fstype [fsize bsize   cpg]
  a:             1.0G               32  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /
  b:             1.2G          2097184    swap                    # none
  c:           232.9G                0  unused
  d:             4.0G          4700832  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /tmp
  e:             6.0G         13089408  4.2BSD   2048 16384 12960 # /var

</pre>
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Old 18th October 2021
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gordon.f View Post
As you can see I can use only 1GBs of area right now.
I'm sorry, but my crystal ball is being repaired. Therefore, just like everyone else, I can only see what you choose to post. I can't look over your shoulder at what you are doing, nor can I read your mind. It looks like you've reinstalled, because you have a completely different disklabel now.
Quote:
Also I'm experiencing sudden crashes even tough I do not pull any cable from the computer
There's nothing anyone can do to help with the minimal information like this that you've posted so far. See "How to create a problem report" in the official link below. While this forum is not an official support channel for the OS, we do try to help users overcome issues. But we can't help at all if we don't have enough information.


http://www.openbsd.org/report.html
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Old 19th October 2021
gordon.f gordon.f is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jggimi View Post
I'm sorry, but my crystal ball is being repaired. Therefore, just like everyone else, I can only see what you choose to post. I can't look over your shoulder at what you are doing, nor can I read your mind. It looks like you've reinstalled, because you have a completely different disklabel now. There's nothing anyone can do to help with the minimal information like this that you've posted so far. See "How to create a problem report" in the official link below. While this forum is not an official support channel for the OS, we do try to help users overcome issues. But we can't help at all if we don't have enough information.


http://www.openbsd.org/report.html
Dear jggimi,


Good day!

Yes, I tried updating but somehow it also interrupted. Anyways the same area which is only 1GB has partitioned for the root and I cannot see or use 232.9 GB of hard disk area in my file manager. I was looking for, is there any command or process that I can introduce this unused area to my OS. Or do I have to install OpenBSD again with appropriate partitioning?

Also thank you for the heads up. I will learn how to create a full fledged problem report.

Best Regards
Gordon
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Old 19th October 2021
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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If I assume that the disklabel you posted in post #7 is your currently active disklabel, there are 11 GB of disk space allocated to filesystems for the OS: 1 GB for the root partition, 4 GB for /tmp, and 6 GB for /var. This is clearly different from the disklabel that you posted in post #4.

The output of $ df -h will show you all mounted filesystems and their utilizations. Please refer to the df(1) man page for more information on this command.

You can manually create disklabel partitions from unallocated disk space with the disklabel(8) command, you can then format newly created partitions with the newfs(8) command, you can mount these partitions with the mount(8) command, and you can have them mounted automatically on boot by provisioning them in the file /etc/fstab, as explained in the fstab(5) man page.

Additionally, you can increase the size of an existing filesystem if there is contiguous un-allocated free space available beyond its location on the drive with growfs(8).

More information on disks, filesystems, and storage management can be found here:
http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq14.html

Last edited by jggimi; 19th October 2021 at 09:46 AM. Reason: typos
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Old 20th October 2021
gordon.f gordon.f is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jggimi View Post
If I assume that the disklabel you posted in post #7 is your currently active disklabel, there are 11 GB of disk space allocated to filesystems for the OS: 1 GB for the root partition, 4 GB for /tmp, and 6 GB for /var. This is clearly different from the disklabel that you posted in post #4.

The output of $ df -h will show you all mounted filesystems and their utilizations. Please refer to the df(1) man page for more information on this command.

You can manually create disklabel partitions from unallocated disk space with the disklabel(8) command, you can then format newly created partitions with the newfs(8) command, you can mount these partitions with the mount(8) command, and you can have them mounted automatically on boot by provisioning them in the file /etc/fstab, as explained in the fstab(5) man page.

Additionally, you can increase the size of an existing filesystem if there is contiguous un-allocated free space available beyond its location on the drive with growfs(8).

More information on disks, filesystems, and storage management can be found here:
http://www.openbsd.org/faq/faq14.html
Dear jggimi;

Good day!

Splendid, thanks for the great explanation. I will delve into aforementioned commands and related man pages. I'm hoping that I will fix this situation.

Best regards
Gordon
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