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Old 9th July 2016
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Default Yoga2 disabling touchscreen

I was playing around with putting OpenBSD on a Yoga2 laptop that I have. FreeBSD doesn't see the wireless card and currently only the vesa driver works (which is painfully slow).

I was getting two messages which spammed the screen upon booting from the USB. One had to with an uhidev. I was able to stop that one by using boot -c and then disable uhidev.

The second one however, reads "ELAN Touchscreen" rev 2.00/0.18 addr 5 at hub0 port 7 not configured. Is there a boot -c disable that I can use on this? (The only methods to disable the touchscreen that I have found so far are by using Windows tools, and I don't have Windows on this.)

I found one similar request in my google travels, from Oct. 15, but it appears that it was never answered.

This is with OpenBSD's install59.fs on a USB.

I don't care about the touchscreen, this wasn't a laptop that I bought for myself. Runs well, with a bit of work, with most flavors of Linux.

Thanks for any input. (Pun intended---ok, ok, I can see myself out.) :-(
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Old 9th July 2016
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You can disable the attached device driver. For example, in this post, the touchscreen happens to attach via a uhidev(4) driver.

Of course, you may need the device driver for other devices.

To my knowledge, you cannot disable a hub because that is not actually a device, and has no driver. It is merely an attachment address.
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Old 9th July 2016
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Correction: you can disable the associated uhub(4) device.
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Old 9th July 2016
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I'm not sure what you mean about disable the attached device driver. I tried to disable hub0, which didn't work. My original question is what is the original device driver, or is there a way to find it, at least? That is, what do I type to disable it.

I already disable uhidev, which stopped the other large part of the screen noise.
So, what do you mean, in this case, by device driver? That is, I don't see anything (save for ums mentioned below, that seems to be a device driver where I can type disable. (And thank you for the attempt to help).

Looking at uhub(4) it mentioned ums for touchscreens, so I tried disable ums and ums0, but no luck there.
I also tried various combinations of uhub0, and uhub0 port 7 and so on. So, let me rephrase the question.

From the information given, are you able to either tell me what disable command I should use, or what steps I would take to get that information?

Thanks.
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Old 9th July 2016
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Look at your dmesg. The devices attach in a chain. If you are unable to interpret it, post it.
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Old 9th July 2016
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The only listing that I'm getting from dmesg is what I posted above, the rev, addr and uhub0 port 7.
This was gotten by trying (as the screen is constantly overwritten with the ELAN messages

dmesg |grep -i ELAN|more and a few others, like grep -i touch |more and so on.

(I also tried grep uhidev but it is disabled, and things like grep -A4 ELAN |more but no information aside from what I've given.)
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Old 9th July 2016
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The dmesg will wrap with the buffer fills. It is possible that /var/run/dmesg.boot contains more info. This file is created by rc(8) during boot, and therefore, the buffer might not have completely filled and wrapped by that point.

Can you disable the touchscreen in hardware configuration menus (BIOS)?

If you fail to find a useful dmesg, and if you are unable to disable the device via hardware, then you might try to see if you get different results from a snapshot (-current, rather than 5.9).
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Old 9th July 2016
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I couldn't find anything in BIOS. I already tried with a snapshot, but had the same results.

Once again, I thank you for your efforts to help.
I didn't have high hopes for this laptop, especially as a lot googling gave no answers. My guess is that it's not really popular with *BSD developers. :-(
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Old 9th July 2016
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You can disable your usb(4) driver, I suppose. But then you may not even have a keyboard.

Here's the layout of USB driver connections from the workstation I'm using at the moment, excerpted from a sysutils/dmassage Tree diagram.
Code:
root
 |-mainbus0
 |  \-pci0
 |     |-ehci0
 |     |  \-usb0
 |     |     \-uhub0
 |     |        \-uhub2
 |     |           |-uhidev0
 |     |           |  \-ukbd0
 |     |           |     \-wskbd1
 |     |           |-uhidev1
 |     |           |  \-ums0
 |     |           |     \-wsmouse2
 |     |           \-uhidev2
 |     |              |-uhid0
 |     |              \-uhid1
Kernel messages could be disabled with a custom kernel, but that won't stop the apparent probe loop. If this laptop of yours had a serial port, you could use that as a console to collect more info with a null modem cable. But modern laptops don't often have serial ports.
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Old 9th July 2016
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No, no serial port. And, while I remain grateful for your help, I've put about as much effort as I'm willing to do with this laptop, which I mainly use for some fairly basic stuff and multimedia (as it has a high resolution screen).
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Old 16th October 2016
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So, several months later, thought I'd post an update. On a quiet Saturday, after latest FreeBSD versions still wouldn't work with this machine's Haswell Intel Video, gave OpenBSD another try. I wasn't able to stop those messages, but I was able to install anyway, as they were more or less rhythmic--I could type in an answer (for much of it I took defaults), let it do its thing, then do my thing.

This was on a snapshot--it's called install60.fs but it's from the snapshots directory.

After installation, though one gets those aggravating messages on vty1 I can just go to vty2 and log in. X seems to work fairly well--sometimes mouse clicks didn't seem to work but I do almost everything by keyboard. Using my usual .Xdefaults with Xft.dpi:180 and a terminus font size of 12 (all described on my yoga2 page, but taken from the ArchLinux wiki), made everything readable. Sound worked, (though using mpv gave me issues till I changed /dev/drm0 from 700 to 770--group is wheel, and I'm in it.

The wireless works but not on a hidden wpa network. I'm surprised at that--with FreeBSD and Linux, one adds a scan_ssid=1 to a wpa_supplicant.conf file, not sure how one does something like that with OpenBSD. (Yeah, I know it doesn't do much, if any, good, but that's how I set it up a long time ago--it's easily briefly changed too.)
I assume I could get it going with wpa_supplicant if I had a real need for it.

So, all in all, pretty much a success. I just used openbox on it with urxvt, and tried firefox and mpv playing a video, but while I wish I could figure out what boot -c command would stop those messages, even if I don't go into X, it's easily avoided by just going to the second virtual console.
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Old 16th October 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottro View Post
it's called install60.fs but it's from the snapshots directory.
-current is already 4 months of development beyond 6.0-release; its name will change to 6.1 prior to 6.1-release.
Quote:
...aggravating messages on vty1 I can just go to vty2 and log in.
On OpenBSD, these are ttyC0 and ttyC1 respectively.
Quote:
...I changed /dev/drm0 from 700 to 770...
How are you starting X? If you use the xdm(1) display manager, or either startx(1) or xinit(1), your userid will be given ownership of /dev/drm0 for the life of your session.
Quote:
The wireless works but not on a hidden wpa network.
Hidden SSID or not, WPA and WPA2 should normally work with pre-shared keys. If you are using pre-shared keys, please post your hostname.if(5) file for your wireless NIC-- you should redact the pre-shared key, of course.
On OpenBSD, the wpa_supplicant package is only used for 802.1X key management services, as it is a "supplicant" requesting certificate authentication from a key management server.

Last edited by jggimi; 16th October 2016 at 01:06 AM. Reason: typo
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Old 16th October 2016
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I am in error. Ownership of the drm(4) device node only transfers with xdm(1).

(Tested to confirm)
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Old 16th October 2016
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Thanks for corrections. I'm starting x after booting into console, with the command startx which uses a $HOME/.xinitrc that was just saying exec openbox-session.
As for wpa_supplicant, yes, I found that out when I tried it. I'm not sure why this doesn't work with a hidden network, but as I said not a big deal. The bigger issue was that the mouse doesn't work well, if at all, and even though I almost never use it, that was annoying. But, I definitely didn't have ownership of /dev/drm0. It was showing, and shows after reboot, crw root wheel. After starting X, again with a simple startx command it's the same, showing 600 root and wheel.

As I don't know if I'll use wireless or wired, I generally don't create hostname.whatever files. When the network is unhidden, a simple ifconfig nwid mynetwork wpakey mykey works without problem.

Thanks for the input. Now, if only the mouse were as giving....meh, sounded funnier in my head, supposed to be some sort joke about input devices.
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Old 16th October 2016
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottro View Post
Thanks for corrections. I'm starting x after booting into console, with the command startx which uses a $HOME/.xinitrc that was just saying exec openbox-session.
If you wish, you can use xdm(1), and log in through that. It will transfer ownership. To use xdm(), you can copy or link your .xinitrc to .xsession. To bring xdm() up at boot, use # rcctl enable xdm.
Quote:
As I don't know if I'll use wireless or wired, I generally don't create hostname.whatever files.
Take a look at trunk(4). If your wired and wireless NICs are on the same subnet, this will allow you to switch back and forth by just plugging/unplugging your Ethernet cable.
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Old 16th October 2016
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Well, just tried with xdm, but it's really less work to chmod 770 on the device for the times I'd use it.

I may look into trunk at some point, but for actual use, it's not really necessary for my needs. I was glad to see though, that it uses the Intel driver properly rather than needing to use vesa.
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