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Old 7th September 2008
JMJ_coder JMJ_coder is offline
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I'm not sure where exactly this should go...

Is it possible to create (x)html so that when a certain portion is displayed in a textual browser (lynx, links) it renders differently - either different font or different color.

I am thinking as far as what might be in code tags in a forum or blog. Or even when a page displays bold or italics - or headings. This should display differently than normal text. I know lynx does some color renderings (though it isn't perfect), but links seems pretty monochrome.

Is this something that needs to be done differently in html (more than normal formatting tags) or something that needs configured in the browser ... or both?
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Old 7th September 2008
richardpl richardpl is offline
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elinks can display colors, you can change colors too.
But it do it differently than lynx - more userfriendly, and elinks on xterm (xterm and elinks compiled with 256colors support) can render html page in almost same colors as GUI browsers ...
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Old 7th September 2008
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The fonts used in a console (and terminal) I believe are dependent upon said terminals capabilities. AFAIK some terminal emulators can display multiple fonts but I don't think you can do that in FreeBSD or OpenBSDs vtty's.
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Old 8th September 2008
BSDfan666 BSDfan666 is offline
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I do believe TerryP is correct, due to the way X terminals work.. it's possible to emulate a terminal type but at the same time add a few "bonus" features (i.e: TrueType/FreeType fonts..)

This does not allow multiple fonts at a single time, features like bold and italics have special escape codes... xterm and friends simply translate this to an available font set.
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Old 10th September 2008
JMJ_coder JMJ_coder is offline
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Thanks, but I am thinking more along the lines of being in a console (not an xterm). I'm still learning my way around wscons and don't know all it's capabilities and limitations.

I just thought that in certain cases, changes in font/font-characteristics is very important. I know that it can do simple changes, such as bold, as in text editors - and even change color and have multicolor (TERM = wsvt25) - but I'm not sure what limits this has; or what applications can make use of this.
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Old 10th September 2008
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With what operating system? the "framework" has changed significantly between FreeBSD/NetBSD and OpenBSD.

At this time, there is no VESA vbe framebuffer for i386 OpenBSD.. it uses a classic 80x25/80x50 VGA text modes.

So fonts are pretty much limited, simplistic even.. but feel free to explore the manual pages, wsfontload(8).

Last edited by BSDfan666; 10th September 2008 at 12:39 AM.
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Old 10th September 2008
JMJ_coder JMJ_coder is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BSDfan666 View Post
With what operating system? the "framework" has changed significantly between FreeBSD/NetBSD and OpenBSD.

At this time, there is no VESA vbe framebuffer for i386 OpenBSD.. it uses a classic 80x25/80x50 VGA text modes.

So fonts are pretty much limited, simplistic even.. but feel free to explore the manual pages, wsfontload(8).
I'm using NetBSD (4.0-current kernel as of June 2008) with wscons. I am looking at different TERMs right now - primarily switching between vt220 (default, I think) and wsvt25.
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