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NetBSD Package System (pkgsrc) Installation and upgrading of packages on NetBSD.

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Old 25th December 2011
two4two two4two is offline
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Default What next? I need a desktop. Want Gnome.

OK, I got to the point where it is time to re-boot. I do that and get the command prompt. So the guide says it's time to customize. I created a non-root user/pwd. I initialized the ssh. I got into basic configuration: I got into 5.15 -- Using packages from pkgsrc, entered the command to point to the repositury exactly as stated in the guide. I also browsed the repository in both http and ftp modes. Can't find a package for gnome. Found a whole bunch related to gnome, but which is the current one for the desktop that will install everything at once? Is the guide wrong when it tells how to specify the repository? Maybe someone can give the correct statement to set the repository, and then the correct statement to install gnome for the current 5.1 release. Thank you very much.
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Old 25th December 2011
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I don't use gnome, but did you try/look under the meta-pkgs/ directory in the repository rather than the gnome/ directory?
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Old 26th December 2011
two4two two4two is offline
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Default How to install gnome

Yes, I looked in there. There is a member called gnome-platform-2.32.1.tgz. What would be the package name? And is this the entire gnome package? In the gnome directory there are members called gnome-desktop-2.32.1nb1.tgz and gnome-build-2.24.1nb7.tgz., plus other interesting members. I'd just like to get to the point that when I boot up the desktop appears and has all the cool useful stuff that gnome has. So where do I point PKG_PATH and what package name do I specify in order to get all of gnome?

Oh, one other question, does NetBSD have a GUI-based software selection/installation tool?


Thanks for all your help.
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Old 26th December 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by two4two View Post
Yes, I looked in there. There is a member called gnome-platform-2.32.1.tgz. What would be the package name?
I think the package name gnome-platform-2.32.1, or simply gnome-platform, could be used. See the EXAMPLES section of the pkg_add(1) man page.

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And is this the entire gnome package?
This I don't know, having never used gnome.

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So where do I point PKG_PATH and what package name do I specify in order to get all of gnome?
I use the following
Code:
PKG_PATH=http://nyftp.netbsd.org/pub/pkgsrc/packages/NetBSD/i386/5.0/All
Before copying this verbatim, you might want to change i386 to your architecture, for example amd64, if it's different. Also note the final directory /All contains all packages available in a single directory (it's like a union of all the individual directories for specific types of things).

As for a package name for all of gnome, again it's beyond my experience. Did you see this list of brief meta-package descriptions? Perhaps someone else who has installed a full gnome may chip in some advice. Or google may help. Or if you want to experiment you could start with relevant sounding meta-packages and see how far you get, then try to add what else you need. gnome-2.26.2nb3 sounds like a good one to start with.

Quote:
Oh, one other question, does NetBSD have a GUI-based software selection/installation tool?
I'm not aware of one, but that doesn't mean much as it's not the kind of thing I would normally use.

BTW, welcome to daemonforums!
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Old 26th December 2011
two4two two4two is offline
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Default NetBSD 5.1 w/gnome

OK, so until someone has the answers I'll try what you suggest and post results as I go. I see old posts for prior releases and prior gnome releases, but nothing yet for the current of both NetBSD and gnome. Maybe I'll actually be of some help in the end.
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Old 26th December 2011
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Default OK, something worked

OK, in the "All" directory I chose gnome-desktop-2.32.1nb1 and it got installed and produced about 10,000 lines of output. How do I go browse that to find if any errors? I did not reboot yet.
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Old 26th December 2011
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Default rebooted but no desktop appears

After that really cool install of a whole lot of gnome and stuff it required, I rebooted and ---- no desktop appears. What next?
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Old 26th December 2011
tolstoi tolstoi is offline
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You got to edit your .xinitrc file in your home directory. Then you have to add some things to /etc/rc.conf like dbus, gdm.

To get those services running you copy the files from /usr/pkg/share/etc/rc.d/examples to your /etc/rc.d so that they can get started at boot time.

Personally I like to check if Xorg works before starting them automatically after booting.
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Old 26th December 2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tolstoi View Post
You got to edit your .xinitrc file in your home directory. Then you have to add some things to /etc/rc.conf like dbus, gdm.

To get those services running you copy the files from /usr/pkg/share/etc/rc.d/examples to your /etc/rc.d so that they can get started at boot time.

Personally I like to check if Xorg works before starting them automatically after booting.

Thanks for your reply. It's great to have such a forum where it helps to learn things. I did do the startx and some windows came up, but I really didn't know what to do with them. What do you mean test if Xorg works? I thought the startx was kind of doing that. How else would I test it better? I'd like to do that. So, what to add to .xinitrc? Is that in the NetBSD guide? I think I can handle the copying you mention. (Maybe! LOL I couldn't eve figure out how to list my current directory. Looks like dir, cd, and such don't work like they do in Linux. So I have some reading to do.
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Old 26th December 2011
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If you are just getting started with BSD's, in my opinion, you picked one of the most difficult. I would recommend you look at OpenBSD to start with for the following reasons:
1) Everything you need to know is in the FAQ which is more succinct.
OpenBSD FAQ
2) The documentation in NetBSD is lagging - for example wireless configuration.
3) Your gnome desktop will be more recent version and there are several tutorials online and in these forums about how to install.
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Old 26th December 2011
tolstoi tolstoi is offline
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If you just type in startx you'll only get the ugly xorg wm running. So to get Gnome running the .xinitrc needs to have an entry like 'exec startkde' for example to run the preferred environment. Don't know what to use for Gnome because I haven't used it for ages. Perhaps exec gnome-session or something like that.

To test if Xorg really works with a detected configuration just run X -configure as root. But as you've already got X going because the wm started up without any complaints I'd assume that everything is ok with your configuration.
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Old 26th December 2011
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You can invoke a particular window manager when you load X without altering any defaults like this:

$ startx /usr/local/bin/fluxbox
I believe for gnome it will be
$ startx /usr/local/bin/gnome-session
But this was cut from the OpenBSD FAQ
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Old 26th December 2011
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I just wanted to add about 1000's of lines of text flying by when you do a package addition. Yes that can be a problem.

I know a couple of ways to deal with that if you think of it in time. First is to pipe the output of the command through tee(1). E.g.,

# pkg_add -v ... | tee mylogfile

Then you have a copy of standard output from the command in the log file (although standard error won't be there without further redirection). You can peruse this file at leisure for any install-time messages, etc.

The second way is to use the script(1) command. It basically starts a new shell and records everything you do in that shell to a file. When you're done exit the shell. By default the file that's recorded is called typescript. It will have some annoying characters in it like ^M that you may want to remove with an editor.

Of course, it's too late for those now since you already installed the packages, but all is not lost! pkg_add records what you installed under /var/db/pkg. Under there is a directory for each package you installed. In those sub-directories are various files, in particular there will be one called +DISPLAY if the package presented any message during install time. You can just read that file with the message in it.

$ find /var/db/pkg -name +DISPLAY

will show you what files may be there to look at.
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