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Old 17th July 2012
barti barti is offline
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Default openbsd basic questions

I have some beginner simple questions.
I will put them here instead of opening new treads.
========================================

Why init 6 does not make the restart?
or init 0 shutdown?



How can I use the cwm window manager?



What is the replacements for chattr or lsattr commands in Linux?



Thanks.
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Old 17th July 2012
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barti View Post
I have some beginner simple questions.
...which should have each been placed in its own thread. Starting new threads is not difficult. Really.

So, I will limit this thread to one topic (arbitrarily determined...).
Quote:
How can I use the cwm window manager?
Study the cwm(1) & cwmrc(5) manpages. The OpenBSD Journal had an article on cwm some time ago:

http://undeadly.org/cgi?action=artic...20090502141551
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Old 17th July 2012
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jggimi jggimi is offline
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I will answer the other questions in separate threads for barti.
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Old 17th July 2012
barti barti is offline
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There are no instructions on how to install it or how work with it.


Quote:
11.5.2 - startx(1) startup
startx(1) looks for the file .xinitrc in the user's home directory. .xinitrc is usually a shell script, which can start as many X "client" (applications that use X) programs as desired. When this script exits, the X server shuts down. Generally, most of the programs run by this script should run in the background, though the last one should run in the foreground (typically the window manager); when it exits, the script will exit, and X will be shutdown.
In the simplest case, this can be as little as just the name of the window manager you wish to invoke:

cwm

Or you can get a little more fancy:
xconsole -geometry -0+0 -fn 5x7 &
oclock -geometry 75x75-0-0 &
xsetroot -solid grey &
cwm

So,

.xinitrc
cwm


startx and .. the gray stuff .
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Old 17th July 2012
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barti View Post
There are no instructions on how to install it or how work with it.
  • The manpages describes the functionality.
  • If you installed all five X filesets at installation, cwm(1) is already installed. I have already mentioned this in your first thread.
So for the spoon & as specified in Section 11.5.2 of the FAQ, all that is required to "start" cwm(1) is place its name as the last binary specified in ~/.xinitrc.

Note that only one window manager can be used at a time in X. If you have another window manager specified, it will have to be removed.

Last edited by ocicat; 17th July 2012 at 06:15 PM. Reason: There are five X-related filesets, not six...
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Old 17th July 2012
ocicat ocicat is offline
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barti View Post
the gray stuff .
If nothing else is specified in ~/.xinitrc, this is correct. Read the cwm(1) manpage about how to start applications within a cwm environment.

As an example, Ctrl-Alt-Enter will open a new xterm(1).
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Old 17th July 2012
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Other questions have been answered in their own threads.

Restart/Shutdown:
http://www.daemonforums.org/showthread.php?t=7298

lsattr/chattr:
http://www.daemonforums.org/showthread.php?t=7299
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Old 17th July 2012
ocicat ocicat is offline
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barti, if you have the expectation that all information relating to OpenBSD can be found in glossy, pretty, easy-to-read how-to documents, your expectation will not be met.

The OpenBSD project is very small. There is no significant help infrastructure in place which fills in all blanks in comparison to larger Unix-like projects. However, the correctness of the OpenBSD manpages is paramount to the developers -- bugs in the manpages have the same importance as bugs in the system.

There is a precise hierarchy as to how much "trust" can be place on all information:
  1. OpenBSD's source code.
  2. OpenBSD's man pages.
  3. Any information found on the OpenBSD project's Website.
  4. Information found in OpenBSD's mailing lists -- especially statements made by developers.
  5. Third-party documentation not officially blessed by the project has dubious value -- including anything said on sites like this one.
Don't trust information found randomly on the Internet. It is frequently old, out-of-date, incomplete, or flat out wrong.

Coming from the Linux community, you have been dealt a disservice. There, one group focuses exclusively on the kernel. Lots of other groups deal with coming up with the various distributions, & no one is really responsible for the documentation. So, there are a number of unrelated efforts which attempt to fill in the holes through their own "howto" documents. The result is an unorganized mess where there are islands of documents stating that "this is all you need to know".

The OpenBSD project doesn't believe in howto documents, & most likely never will in the future. Users are expected to have enough intelligence to read the manpages & other project documentation for comprehension -- meaning thinking through what has been written to fill in the holes that may exist themselves.

Discipline is required.
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Old 17th July 2012
barti barti is offline
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That's good to know.

Well, it is a different world here, completely !

No ext3, different init, different culture, no howto's , etc.........


I need to adjust .
It's hard to catch all in just few weeks.


And I say this again, this is why people don't work with openbsd.

I never heard of someone working with it.

After reading so many posts on the internet, I'm sure they are all wrong.
They should forget about Linux and stick only to BSD systems.
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Old 17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barti View Post
It's hard to catch all in just few weeks.
Your expectations may not have been very realistic.
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Old 17th July 2012
daemonfowl daemonfowl is offline
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Looooooool ! sorry but I can't help laughing at myself ! I recalled having started a thread advocating OpenBSD for newbs .. and yet you can't escape falling for the OS once you start using it .. it's far superior !!!
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Old 17th July 2012
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Quote:
Originally Posted by barti View Post
Well, it is a different world here, completely !
Not quite true. The BSDs and Linuxes have completely different histories, and different communities, but there are more operational similarities than differences, as they are both Unix-like. There are open standards to which both adhere, and many applications run just fine in both arenas.
Quote:
No ext3
OpenBSD can format, mount, and test the integrity of EXT2 filesystems. EXT3 is just EXT2 with journaling, otherwise the filesystems are functionally identical.
Quote:
I need to adjust .
It's hard to catch all in just few weeks.
For someone who is an experienced, technical IT professional with Unix or Linux experience, it usually takes months to develop considerable administrative proficiency. For anyone else, it usually takes longer.

As I'd posted before, technical skills are required -- either by learning them, or by purchasing them.
From all of your posts to date I assume that your Linux experience has been limited to a push-button install of a pre-configured desktop environment where the technical configuration decisions were made for you by your chosen distribution.

In the BSD family, the only system that comes close to that is PC-BSD. It is a "distribution" of FreeBSD where configuration and third party software decisions have already been made for you.
Quote:
After reading so many posts on the internet, I'm sure they are all wrong.
They should forget about Linux and stick only to BSD systems.
I don't know what you're reading. Nor do I particularly care. But I disagree that people should "forget about Linux". Perhaps not for you, but for others, there are many valid uses for Linux. There are in this world, both applications or infrastructures that require it.

An OS is a tool. Your choice of OS should be based on the use you put it to -- the applications you deploy it for. And you do use non-Linux and non-BSD applications, even now. You have Windows installed ... you mentioned this in your first posts. Which means, to me, that there was some reason that you did not abandon Windows when you installed Linux. Some application, or set of applications, that Linux could not provide, but Windows could.

At the moment, I am typing on a netbook that runs three different OSes. Each is there because of unique functional requirements that cannot be satisfied by the others.
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Old 17th July 2012
daemonfowl daemonfowl is offline
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Well-said Sir ..
While there is always an OS which you like .. there is too an OS which you simply have to use .. if you go through the Distrowatch pages , an see those divisions (specialist , forensics , desktop , old hardware , security , etc ) you see how people differ not only in tastes but in needs .. but again they may often swap needs with time .. or change tastes over time .. there is charm when you hear about some distros for the spirit they preach : slackware/gentoo .. some are just beloved penguins anyway :-)
But Daemons rock !!!!!!
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