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Old 28th January 2014
chessmaster chessmaster is offline
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Hello, I will be trying OpenBSD for the first time soon and very excited. My question is it possible to run pkgng repository on OpenBSD?
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Old 28th January 2014
J65nko J65nko is offline
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You mean the FreeBSD pkgng ?
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Old 28th January 2014
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Hello, and welcome!

Like the other BSDs, OpenBSD has its own packaging system for 3rd party applications, which is described in detail in OpenBSD FAQ 15. Some of the history of the various porting and packaging systems used by the BSDs, with developer interviews, can be found on the NetBSD website beginning here.

Here's the intro from the FAQ mentioned above.:
Quote:
There are a lot of third party applications available which one might want to use on an OpenBSD system. To make this software easier to install and manage, plus to help it comply with OpenBSD's policy and goals, the third party software is ported to OpenBSD. This porting effort can involve many different things. Examples are: making the software use the standard OpenBSD directory layout (e.g. configuration files go into /etc), conforming to OpenBSD's shared library specifications, making the software more secure whenever possible, etc.

The end result of the porting effort are ready-to-install binary packages. The aim of the package system is to keep track of which software gets installed, so that it may at any time be updated or removed very easily. This way, no unnecessary files are left behind, and users can keep their systems clean. The package system also helps ensure nothing is deleted by accident, causing software to stop functioning properly. Another advantage is that users rarely need to compile software from source, as packages have already been compiled and are available and ready to be used on an OpenBSD system. In minutes, a large number of packages can be fetched and installed, with everything in the right place.
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Old 28th January 2014
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I think it is grand that we can compile programs from source, but, I rarely if ever do that on my OpenBSD systems. I prefer using the binary packages that are available for us.
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Old 29th January 2014
chessmaster chessmaster is offline
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I'm curious why would one want to use binary instead of ports? @J65nko yeah the pkgng from FreeBSD.
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Old 29th January 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmaster View Post
I'm curious why would one want to use binary instead of ports?
  • When using the OpenBSD package system, there is no difference between what will be built locally & what is available on the mirrors unless custom options are being used.
  • Building can also significantly tax resource limited systems.
Section 15.1 of the project's FAQ covers this very topic.
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Old 29th January 2014
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chessmaster View Post
I'm curious why would one want to use binary instead of ports?
Another reason is convenience. We don't mix and match -current ports with -release or -stable systems, so there isn't a common need for users of those flavors of the OS to build their own packages.
On OpenBSD, the ports tree is required to be kept in sync with with the OS, primarily to ensure correct library functions.


Last edited by jggimi; 29th January 2014 at 02:11 PM. Reason: clarity
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Old 30th January 2014
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That's great informaton knowing the flavors of the ports(in OpenBSD) match the flavor of the build running. To ensure rock solid stability. In the excellent documentation provided on the site. I see that pkg_add is used on OpenBSD. "Sorry got spolied with the pkg autoremove feature on FreeBSD".
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Old 30th January 2014
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See the -a option of the pkg_delete(1) man page.
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